Mixed-Blessings Model

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PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to inform readers about the stigma that is put onto mentally ill people and explain the different studies used to try and reduce the stigma. Also, how the mentally ill and clinicians respond to the claims. Biogenetics explanations and stigma are the main focus in the first few paragraphs on page 400. It is written that after studies and research they found that biogenetic explanations are often tied to stigmatized attitudes. Unfortunately, people actually were more fearful and rejecting when someone with a mental illness explained it to them using the biogenetic explanations. Haslam and Kvaale carried out two studies and in the end found that people reduced the blame they had on the those with mental …show more content…
There is a brief focus on the studies that Haslam and Kvaale did to test whether biogenetic explanations reduced or increased the stigma on the mentally ill. It is written that they examined "25 correlation studies on the naturally occurring associations between explanations and stigma for a variety of mental disorders..." (400). They also looked at 28 studies where explanations were manipulated experimentally (400). Both studies named the Mixed-Blessings Model. After both studies, the author writes "Findings were highly consistent across the two projects....Biogenetic explanations were associated with a reduced tendency to blame people with mental disorders for their problems but an increased tendency to perceive them as dangerous and unpredictable" (400). From the two studies, Haslam and Kvaale explain that people are more sympathetic towards those with mental illnesses when they know that it is uncontrollable instead of the person behaving at their own free will. It is written that there is strong evidence that biogenetic explanations cause essentialist thinking, meaning someone has a fixed, set character. On page 401, it said that evidence fails to support the claim that biogenetic explanations help the mentally ill rethink of their illness as a disease instead of something that is just apart of them. It is then written that a study showed that clinicians show less …show more content…
I know what they are talking about, it 's just put into a more scientific perspective. I am not surprised that people think of the mentally ill as dangerous due to the murders and things that go around everyday, and the media portrays them as being severely mentally ill and should have been treated earlier. Therefore, normal people stereotype those with mental illnesses about what they could be capable of, when in fact most people just want help. I really enjoyed reading this article as it pertains to the field i want to go into. I think its scary how many mentally ill people need help, especially adults, and a lot of the therapists out there don 't really care. I came face to face with this. From what I have seen, those under 18 are treated as if their life is the most precious thing, which it is, but when you 're an adult it 's like therapists completely change and think of their patients as another sob story that won 't ever get better. It takes someone with a mental illness a long time to fully understand and accept their disorder. Social media has really helped people cope with their disorder and find others like them that they can talk to. It has also informed many people who have no idea about any mental illness how to understand others that are different. Obviously there are still many, many years to go before people start to truly accept the mentally ill and are willing to actually help them instead of

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