King Of Chess By Mao Zedong Summary

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The era of communism had begun. Mao Zedong proclaimed the People’s Republic of China and began his firm rule over his people. Through the People’s Republic social, land, and cultural reforms took place. In 1966, Mao instituted perhaps his most devastating and destructive reforms to Chinese society; the Cultural Revolutions. The goal of this reformation was to purge China from its impure elements and revive a revolutionary communistic spirit and effectively caused a massive removal of old traditions established in China. Mao Zedong wanted to clear China 's history and remove the unorganized Chinese system to create order in the Chinese society. However the Chinese’s supposed "unorganized system" was, in fact, a structured system and the removal this caused chaos in the society.
“King of Chess”, like all the novellas in Ah Cheng 's composition, follows a progression from a structured chaos to a chaotic structure. Mao, when he assumed power in China, sought to get rid of the generation old heritage, tradition, and culture that was passed down by the Chinese ancestors. This culture was standing in Mao 's way from firm power and
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The narrator understands why this happened to his parents because of the glory of Mao’s desires and commands and also why the removal of his family 's property as "being very right and proper" (59). Ah Cheng 's choice to begin the “King of Chess” in such a way, juxtaposing purging of property and Mao 's repetitious songs that "just made everyone even more jittery" (59), sets the transition and mood of the story of Mao’s political presence and the chaos and destruction that results. While as a child, the narrator in the “King of Chess” was content with Mao Zedong 's actions, the surrounding text communicates a resentful tone to the reader which sets up the novella as a political metaphor for Mao Zedong 's Cultural

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