Sigmund Freud And The Psychoanaalysis Theory

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Freud was born in Austria by Jewish parents who raised him in a traditional Jewish manner. The knowledge and experiences Freud encountered throughout his life influenced his work; especially his childhood was influential on the theory of psychosexual development. Freud’s childhood and relationship to his parents as well as religious background was contributing factors in the development of the psychoanalysis theory. Further, being raised in a Jewish family had an impact throughout his entire life, as the anti-Semitism became more dominant throughout the 20th century as the Nazis oppressed and persecuted Jews. Freud’s theories are still used in the 21st century and several psychological approaches and theories sprung from Freud’s theories. …show more content…
Freud’s parents, especially his father, were very authoritarian, which affected the way Freud came to understand human behavior and had an impact on his development of theories. Freud inherited his father’s sense of humor, skepticism, liberalism and freethinking, and his ability to indicate a moral, which he knew by quoting a Jewish anecdote. Freud inherited his mother’s sentimentality or temperament with passionate emotions. Freud did not inherit his intellect from either parents; Freud’s intellect was his own. However, despite coming from a Jewish background, Sigmund Freud’s father, Jacob Freud, was not a very religious man by the time his son, Sigmund Freud, was born. Jacob Freud was raised religiously as a Jew and did exercise the Jewish values and rituals when he was younger due to his strictly Orthodox Jewish upbringing. Nevertheless, by the age of twenty, Jacob Freud went from being strictly Orthodox to being estranged from his native environment due to moving to Freiberg. By the time Jacob Freud’s son, Sigmund Freud was born, Jacob Freud had abandoned most of his religious observances but Jacob Freud still maintained his Jewish identity and beliefs. Jacob Freud passed on his Jewish values to his children; however, Sigmund Freud only embraced the Jewish identity but not the religious aspect of being a Jew. Due to the way Jacob Freud raised his children, Sigmund Freud was not a religious Jew, …show more content…
Freud’s relationship to his father led to one of his psychoanalytic theories including his relationship to his mother, Amalia Nathansohn Freud, and the Oedipus complex. Freud’s relationship to his mother and the feelings he developed due to his childhood, inspired him to the idea behind the Oedipus complex as a part of the psychoanalytic approach. While Freud was developing the psychosexual stages along side the psychoanalysis, Freud was inspired by the feelings he encountered as a child toward his mother and the jealousy of his father, which is implied in the Oedipus complex. Freud’s psychoanalytic approach was inspired by his relationship to his parents as well as the story about Oedipus, which was a part of his structure of personality. Freud divided the personality into three categories: the id, the ego, and the superego. The id is the part of the personality with the impulses and drives as well as instincts and is ruled by the pleasure principle. The ego is the part of the personality that is the executer and tries to mediate between the desires of the id and reality. The ego is ruled by the reality principle. Lastly, the superego is concerned with the morality of the personality and works in contradiction to the id. In the story about Oedipus, Oedipus

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