Solution Focused Therapy Case Study

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Solution Focused Therapy is a brief therapy that is a future focused; goal directed therapy model that is more concerned with solution building than it is the problem that brought the client in for counseling. Developed by Shazer and Berg, SFT is a collaborative approach that is used to promote change in client’s behavior by having them envision a future without their problems and helping them realize that they are the experts in their lives. By helping them realize that they are the experts they then understand that they are adept at solving their own problems using their strengths, values, and abilities. Although collaborative in approach, the therapist would take on a not-knowing, naivety stance while still exploring client strengths and …show more content…
It is important that the family identify what they believe the problem is because it provides information on what they perceive the problem to be, as well as how they’ll know the problem has been solved. When it comes to the family in this case, the solution focused model would focus on the negative circular interaction patterns between Donna, Steven, and Anthony. The therapist’s approach is to have the family elaborate the problem only to identify repetitive cycles of negative behavior. The change in interaction pattern more than likely has occurred because Anthony is getting older and his relationship with parents is changing. There seems to be difference in parenting styles due to upbringing. Donna was brought up stricter than Steven, and she is trying to be the same way with Anthony. Anthony seems to be more like his father pushing limits and defiant, so I think Steven can identify more with Anthony, and is more flexible even though he doesn’t like some of his behaviors. While a change in relationship is inevitable, Anthony’s parents feel like his changes are negative, and due to the change in circumstance, and a difference in views, they now have to change how …show more content…
The therapist would point out that Donna and Steven focus on the parenting skills and parenting strengths that would promote positive interactions between them and Anthony in the future. The same would go for Anthony who needs to understand that even though he is a child he has strengths, power, and the ability to affect change as well just based on how he chooses to interact and behave. In Solution Focused therapy, helping Anthony and his parents understand their perceptions and interpretations of their interactions or situation will help them use their skills and strengths to change their negative interactions. Through the use of techniques like the miracle question and scaling, the family can co-construct problem free futures, and with the use of goal setting they can move toward more positive behaviors and interactions. The focus is not on what isn’t working, but what has worked in the past that they can use to solve their current

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