Sexism In A Doll's House Analysis

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In the play A Doll’s House, Henrik Ibsen utilizes the dialogue between Torvald Helmer and Nora to expose the sexist nature of their society that reduces women to inferior positions and imposes restrictive roles on them. Indeed, Ibsen reveals his desire to modify these confining societal norms through Nora’s transformation at the end of the play, evident through her shift in language to Helmer, and further in her denunciation of all obligations society foists upon women. Torvald Helmer’s language to his wife Nora illustrates is idea of her as subordinate to him within society and their household. He also restricts her to the role of wife and mother and implies her helplessness to illustrates the sexist nature of society in the late 1800’s. Nora …show more content…
To further depict her dominance, Helmer pleads for her forgiveness and even offers to change his attitudes and traditions for her. Ibsen portrays the sexist society through Helmer’s demeaning language to Nora and through her obedience; however, he illustrates his desire to alter these norms through Nora’s epiphany and refusal of her social obligations.
Ibsen portrays male dominance in society through the chauvinistic language Helmer employs when conversing with Nora since his language he demeans her and makes her inferior to him in society and
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A change in Nora’s language to Helmer emerges when she no longer accepts his demeaning nicknames. For instance, Nora says, “I was your little skylark, your doll . . . I am no wife for you” (282). With the rejection of Helmer’s childish nicknames, she displays her break from an inferior position and loyal obedience to her husband as a result of her newfound identity that counters all societal expectations of a woman in the late 1800’s. As Nora fully realizes her place as an individual in society opposed to only a wife and mother, she verbally stands up to Helmer and demonstrates her defiance of sexist traditions concerning women’s subordinate roles within society. She declares, “I have other duties just as sacred . . . Duties to myself” (280). The empowerment of Nora, illustrated in the previous passage, allows her to take control from Helmer and depicts her transformation from an inferior to a superior position of authority to her husband. Ibsen also portrays Helmer’s shift in language to Nora to demonstrate his role reversal, which helps to depict society’s wrongfulness in characterizing women as inferior to men. With Nora getting ready to leave him forever, Helmer pleads for her to stay

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