Security Management Strategy

811 Words 4 Pages
Before a security manager can “sell” a strategy, the manager must first have a keen awareness of what the organization does and how security fits into it. The security manager must fully understand the organizational mission and what processes within the organization are needed to accomplish the mission. The security manager must be able to identify organizational assets, liabilities and threats. The vulnerability of system processes are identified and rated on a scale as to likelihood. Conducting a proper risk assessment which focuses efforts on the greatest hazards will help mitigate the confrontation of risks which threatens an organization’s survival. Security managers use the preparedness phase in the development of plans in accordance …show more content…
These could be personnel who control departments key to the organization’s function or perhaps the chief financial officer who controls budgeting. There are two reasons for this strategy; it gives the chance for the security manager to become better educated on particular processes while simultaneously communicating security objectives. The security officer may have been intent on implementing a new process only to find out it has been tried before and failed. It might be wise to be armed with critical information before approaching leadership with your plans. Another reason I think its important to involve other team managers is synergy. Personnel within organizations must work together in order to effectuate a common good. Fay (2010) describes the forging of healthy relationships across the board and up and down the organization as part of the “buy-in” process. This is not a one way flow of information but must be part of a mutual process in which security is actively promoted by leadership and made a “visible strategic priority” (Fay, 2010, p. 305). Bringing in people who support the security manager plan could only …show more content…
We discussed this in a previous forum. If an organization deals with hazardous materials, for instance, the business has a legal obligation to ensure employees have the appropriate HAZMAT training. Many law enforcement agencies have chosen to improve the delivery of their services by meeting the accreditation standards of CALEA (CALEA, n.d.). I don’t think it is a hard sell to organizational leadership that an enhanced security strategy might not only improve functionality but prove justified if the organization is to conduct its operations

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