Save The Union Analysis

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“If I could save the Union by freeing no slaves I would do it, if I could save the Union by freeing all of the slaves I would do it.” Abraham Lincoln’s thinking was that it was bad about slavery, but it was States’ Rights. It was only when the South was using slavery to support its illegal uprising that he functioned to free the slaves. Lincoln abhorred slavery, and always had. He didn't think the Constitution gave the President the power to act on it, but that didn't change his view that slavery was an abomination. Surely, Lincoln did put one thing above the issue of slavery, the protection of the Union, which is the foundation for his speech claiming that if he could protect the Union by allowing slavery he would do it. Throughout the Civil …show more content…
Indeed, by today's morals his philosophy wasn’t that accurate and possibly even incorrect, but in his day his thinking was deliberated advanced, even fundamental, although there were many more fundamental philosophers in his time period. He favored tactics, which would pay compensation to slave-owners for their freed slaves and relocate the freed slaves to some altered areas. As the 16th American president, focused to end slavery, Abraham Lincoln finally put a conclusion to his hard work by writing the Emancipation Proclamation. Abraham Lincoln had no objective on freeing the slaves when he was elected as the president of the United States of America. Even though Lincoln though Slavery was wrong, he always trusted in white control. He said, “If slavery is not wrong, then nothing is wrong.” When the war started he only thought of it as saving the union. Abraham Lincoln has all the recognition for the freeing of the slaves and making peace in the world between blacks and

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