Savagery And Civilisation In The Novel Of Grenville

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Savagery and civilisation play a major role in the interpretation of the novel; the treatment of the Aboriginal people is what draws the line between savagery and civilisation. Grenville depicts civilisation through Blackwood’s character. His lifestyle, family and land differ from the rest of the settlers enhancing the curiosity of the reader about Blackwood. On the other hand, savagery is pronounced by Smasher Sullivan, Blackwood’s opposing character. Smasher’s treatment towards the Aboriginal people disgusts the reader. The convicts referred to the Aboriginals as savages, however, Grenville’s use of metaphors and imagery contradicts the belief of the convicts and allows the reader to sympathise for the Aboriginal people. Grenville presents civilisation through Blackwood’s character. He is a prominent ‘civilised’ character in the novel, respects the Aboriginal people and treats them as humans. “Give a little, take a little” is an ideology Blackwood lives by, an example he gives is when the Aboriginal people gave his daisy yams when he first came, but them took his hat in return. The give and take policy is illustrated as a law which Blackwood follows. This links to civilisation as being ‘civilised’ is living peacefully with humanity, no matter what …show more content…
From a reader’s point of view, Grenville’s description of Smasher’s clear savage attributes automatically develops hatred towards Smasher. Meanwhile with Blackwood, his civilised manner is explicitly depicted throughout the novel to enhance our understanding of his character. Savagery and civilisation are exhibited through the perspective of a British settler and Grenville’s perspective. Civilisation and savagery is a key part of our lives and Grenville presents them in her novel to display the importance of understanding between races and ethnicities which is needed in a

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