Sagalassos

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Sagalassos has remained a mystery to archaeologists for the past thousands of years. Despite being occupied for thousands of years by multiple different groups, Sagalassos crumbled to ruins and was forgotten. However, in the recent years since the discovery of the site, new information has been learned through excavations. More fine details are able to be obtained today through the use of new techniques and technology. The archaeologists at Sagalassos have used the available technology and workforce to discover the answers to their questions. In past excavations, archaeologists were trying to simply document the archaeological record for the site, however the excavation project conducted by the University of Leuven from Belgium is discovering …show more content…
The site is a few miles from the modern-day city of Ağlasun. The Luwians settled at Sagalassos in the 3rd millennium BCE. The site was conquered by Alexander the Great, during his conquest of the ancient world. The Greek culture that he brought highly influenced the people and was popular among them, shaping their art and the way they lived their lives. During the Roman empire, Sagalassos lived with great prosperity starting under the rule of Augustus Caesar. Since the valleys were more fertile than they are today, the city mainly relied on farming for the economy. There was an abundance of clay and natural resources that resulted in their pottery production call Sagalassos red slip ware, that travelled the Eastern Mediterranean. However, in the 6th century several plagues severely damaged the site. In 610 CE, an earthquake destroyed the city. After that, the people lived dispersed in hamlets until the 13th century CE when the Seljuks destroyed their last stronghold and absorbed the people into the Turkish empire (Sagalassos: Archaeology Research Project, …show more content…
Not only are there new methods for archaeology being tested at Sagalassos, but the comparison of technology when used with archaeological sites can be analyzed. Archaeologists at Sagalassos have compared the Ikonos-2 and Quickbird-2 in their relation to their spectral quality of archaeological structures, the spectral band characteristics, and the effectiveness of pixel and object based classification. Only two sites, Sagalassos and Hisar, have evaluation on Ikonos-2 imagery. The results concluded that the Quickbird-2 is better for visual identification than Ikonos-2. The enhanced ground resolution increase the visual identification of the ancient remains (De Laet,

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