Palo Duro Canyon History

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The significance of the battle I have chose not only made Texas safer, but it also gave birth to our states national park! My bucket list dream is to travel the United States and to see all major historical landmarks. Without the Battle of Palo Duro Canyon, the Texas-Indian War would not have ended. Of course history would take a different course to have eased these tensions had this battle not occurred, but it certainly would not be as epic of a tale as the one written about in this paper.
Palo Duro Canyon is the most dynamite and beautiful scene highlight in the Panhandle of Texas. The Spanish name Palo Duro signifies "hardwood" and alludes to the hardwood bushes and trees found in the gully. Palo Duro Canyon cuts into the eastern Caprock
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The primary known occupants, who date from the period between ten-thousand and five-thousand B.C. hunted of the extinct Goliath Buffalo and Mammoths. Archeologists have discovered shot focuses, stone instruments, mortar gaps, artistic creations, carvings, and different antiquities of these and later ancient individuals at various destinations all through the …show more content…
The district was surrounded by groups of pre-horse-culture Apache Indians who depended vigorously on wild ox for sustenance, apparel, and haven. In the eighteenth century, after the Plains Indians had obtained stallions, the gulch turned into a noteworthy Comanche and Kiowa campground. Dealers from New Mexico called Comancheros much of the time came to Palo Duro to exchange with the Indians. The primary Anglo-Americans to investigate were under Captain Randolph B. Marcy, looking for the wellsprings of the Red River. The Comanches and their partners continued outdoors there until 1874, when United States Cavalry troops under Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie influenced an astonishment to day break assault on an extensive place to stay of Comanches, Kiowas, and Cheyennes, driving them to come back to their reservations in Indian Territory. In 1876 groups of armed force designers, teamsters, and regular citizen sketcher was in the range to investigate the Red River's headwaters and lead a topographic and logical overview. Their report was the most point by point report accumulated up to that time on the focal Panhandle district, including Palo Duro

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