Romanticism In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House

981 Words 4 Pages
Romanticism was a prominent literary movement that arose in the eigh teenth century as an combatant against the Neoclassic period, Enlightenment period, and Industrial Revolution.. This new movement called Romanticism can roughly be defined as a movement in literature, art, and an outlook on life itself. Furthermore, the rejection to the Neoclassical and Enlightenment periods lead Romantics to concentrate on the individual, one 's feelings, and the degree of human points of confinement. The individual person as opposed to society as a whole was a focus. Imagination and emotion were upheld as opposed to reason and logic. The Romantics would express this through poetry, music, and art. But they drew away from the typical rules and confines …show more content…
It shows the Romantic element of escaping reality. The first four lines are him describing an emotion of yearning and want. Although this work still depicts emotions in some aspects, it also describes an unreal fantasy and in a sense making the reader feel as if the character being described also unreal.. This love poem which offers the beloved a world of beauty.
To further add on, you have the Realist who strayed away from emotion, but instead pursued showing reality and the cold harsh truth of human nature. This can be shown in Henrik Ibsen’s play A Doll House Ibsen describes reality as it in Nora 's treachery:
For heaven’s sake, no! Are you serious? He’s so strict on that subject. Besides— Torvald, with all his masculine pride—how painfully humiliating for him if he ever found out he was in debt to me. That would just ruin our relationship. Our beautiful, happy home would never be the same.(955)
Nora deceives Torvald about the loan and hides her own strength, even lying to him about trivial matters such as eating sweets, because she intuits that he cannot tolerate the truth about their marriage. From the short depiction, it shows how Realist will emphasize on showing reality and the truth at hand opposed to the Romantic’s escape from

Related Documents