Similarities Between Gottlieb And Guha

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Roger Gottlieb, Robert Bullard, and Ramachandra Guha write on contemporary global environmental movements and the deficiencies they face. While Gottlieb and Bullard’s works suggest the ongoing inability of environmental groups to incorporate needs of minority communities into their practices, Guha concedes that most global environmentalism—which also tends to be conducted by developed, white countries—denies developing countries a say in the creation of global environmental consciousness and policy, and is, therefore, hypocritical and inept.
It is important to consider how environmentalism has shifted over the last hundred years. For instance, early environmentalism in the United States was primarily focused on the protection of natural beauty—the intrinsic value of the natural world—whereas contemporary environmental movements tend to focus on environmental damages as a result of pollution and the communities affected by
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(Guha 176) Guha writes, “…few among these lovers of nature scrutinize their own lifestyle, their own heavy reliance on nonrenewable resources, and the ecological footprint their consumption patterns leave on the soil, forest, waters, and air of lands other than their own.” (Guha 177) Guha implies throughout his piece that Western environmentalism does not belong in the developing world, that it perhaps is not applicable to the lives of those in developing countries. As Gottlieb and Bullard both suggest, the community of those impacted most heavily by environmental organizations is underrepresented in these groups and is therefore reluctant to accept the movements of them. Such is the case in developing countries as well, as seldom do the citizens of these nations enjoy the benefits of the nature conservancies established on their land. (Guha

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