Globalization Research Paper

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Globalization is by no means a new phenomenon. One can argue that its existence can be traced back thousands of years to cross cultural interactions that took place before the Silk Roads. However, the rate and scope of globalization has accelerated rapidly in the past several decades with the onsets of new technologies. Nationalism is inherent. Humans have always derived some degree of identity and security from their cultural traditions, heritage, and nationality. This does not change with the acceleration of globalization. Globalization and nationalism reinforce one another. The increasingly global and integrated commons is only a result of the individual and unique nations that comprise the world. A more feasible argument is that globalization …show more content…
This paranoia has the effect of strengthening nationalism often to dangerous proportions. Radical right wing political movements can arise in response to globalization in an effort to preserve autonomy and cultural identity. There has become a massive movement arising in the past couple of decades against the global gravitation towards western societal values. The dominance of western culture is being rejected by many who are contesting western superiority with their own local cultural identities. So rather than diminishing or suppressing nationalism, globalization has actually highlighted the stark contrasts between peoples of different ethnic groups across the world and strengthened cultural identities. Middle Eastern social relations are so unique that they often foster an all out assault on globalization and the idea of the world become a more integrated society. The basic tenets of Middle Eastern social relations are such that it is impossible to create an inclusive society in the Middle East because of the "deep culture" that has been instilled in people since the Bedouin tribes(Salzman 24). The tenets of their social culture include to always trust your kin and regard the state as an enemy(Salzman 27). Conflicts that occur within the Middle East then will not be overcome by globalization. The prospects of a more

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