Revenge And Cyclical Revenge In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In Frankenstein, author Mary Shelley explores how seeking vengeance can grip and ruin the lives of the individuals who give in to it. She creates a conflict between two emotionally driven characters, Victor Frankenstein and the Creature, who entangle themselves in an endless cycle of revenge. Examining cyclical revenge and its various aspects, the novel argues the futility of seeking vengeance.
Strong emotions like anger and hatred towards his maker constitute the crux of the Creature’s character. Society and Victor both reject his creation, forcing it into isolation and loneliness. "I had gazed on him while unfinished; he was ugly then; but when those muscles and joints were rendered capable of motion, it became a thing such as even Dante
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Rather than capitulating with the Creature’s demands, Frankenstein provokes the Creature in search of his own emotional fulfillment. The Creature demands Frankenstein make it a companion, so it will not be the only one of its kind. Frankenstein agrees to do so, but destroys the second creation in view of the Creature. Victor assembled another creation, despite some apprehension, only to destroy the Creature’s mate. "I was now about to form another being, of whose dispositions I was alike ignorant; she might become ten thousand times more malignant than her mate, and delight, for its own sake, in murder and wretchedness." (Shelley 170) Frankenstein may say his reasonings were to save society from another murderous being, but his decision to destroy the mate in view of the Creature suggests something more. Frankenstein destroys the mate, which upsets the Creature, as his own form of revenge. Considering the Creature murdered William, Frankenstein uses the “eye for an eye” justification by taking away the Creature’s potential companion. Both of them have suffered a loss. Victor’s course of action does not bring closure to the conflict between these characters. The cycle of revenge continues to take away from both characters, fueled by the emotional intensities of Frankenstein and his …show more content…
Months of travel and a swift decline in the health of Victor Frankenstein has not tempered his desire to exact revenge upon his creation. Even at his most feeble Frankenstein wishes to kill his creation. “I am weak; but surely the spirits who assist my vengeance will endow my with sufficient strength.”(Shelley 219) Frankenstein hunts the Creature far north, only to die with his goal unfulfilled. Vengeance has consumed Victor to the point he tries to pass on his quest to Walton. “...I asked you to undertake my unfinished work; and I renew this request now,...”(Shelly 220) Yet the request by Frankenstein is futile because Walton has already made the decision to return to England. Furthermore, Frankenstein was foolish to have even pursued his creation. Yes, he has lost his father, Elizabeth, Henry Clerval and William to the Creature, but Frankenstein could have avoided these events had he not provoked the beast after William’s death. Therefore Frankenstein dies in the cold, amongst strangers, without any gratification because he did not complete what he set out to achieve. Shelly’s closure to his character indicates how seeking vengeance only brings more pain and

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