Religious And Social Causes And Continuities In Confucianism In China

1050 Words 5 Pages
China saw significant religious and social changes and continuities from 1200 to 1750 C.E. Confucianism continued to be a religion practiced by many Chinese citizens. However, as the period continued, the practice of Confucianism became far more popular. Socially, the emphasis on family in China maintained its importance in society. Nonetheless, as the period continued, the subordination of women within these families increased in severity.
From 1200 to 1750 C.E., Confucianism continued to be widely practiced religion amongst Chinese citizens (CONT). In 1200 C.E., the traditional philosophies and religions of China continued under the rule of the Yuan dynasty. By 1750 C.E., despite the rise and fall of the Yuan and Ming dynasties, Confucianism
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Internally, the cause of this religious continuity is social, for Confucianism had become heavily connected with everyday Chinese life that the society depended on the strict, stable social structure the religion had created (AN). Externally, the cause of this religious continuity was political, despite foreign occupancy, which posed a threat to religion in many societies, the Mongols allowed Confucianism, amongst other religions, to be practiced freely (WHC).
As the period continued, Confucianism gained in popularity (CH). In 1200 C.E., although practiced by many citizens, Confucianism lacked the endorsement of political figures. The religiously tolerant Mongols allowed several religions to be practiced in China,
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In 1200 C.E., China relied heavily on tightly knit patriarchal families. Individual families were linked to other relatives in extended family networks that included brothers, uncles, and any living grandparents. Among the wealthy landowning groups, family authority was enhanced by the practice of ancestor worship, which joined family members through rituals devoted to important forebears who had passed into the spirit world. For ordinary people, among whom ancestor worship was less common, village authority surmounted family rule. In 1750 C.E., these principles remained, and as Confucianism gained influence under the Ming and Qing dynasties, these principles were especially important. The Confucian list of virtues stressed respect for one 's social superiors--including fathers and husbands as leaders of the family. The cause of this social continuity was religious, for Confucian values were heavily infused with Chinese culture and tradition, so as Confucianism remained an widely practiced religion during this period, so did the Confucian principles that heavily influenced society (AN). More broadly, the cause of this social continuity was political, despite foreign occupancy, which posed a threat to social structure in many civilizations, the Mongols allowed Confucianism, amongst other religions, to be practiced freely so these values regarding family were upheld

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