Invention Of Homosexuality

Superior Essays
There a several procedures of disappearing Homosexual bodies. Governments can use political agency to label and separate communities, terms can be created to divide and shame people and even medical practices can be used to enact fear in individuals. In order to learn more about these methods, I’ll use the “Invention of Heterosexuality” by Johnathan Katz, “Scientific Racism and the Emergence of the Homosexual Body” by Siobhan Somerville, “DISABILITY, SEX RADICALISM, AND POLITICAL AGENCY” by Abby Wilkerson, and “Methodologies” by Dean Spade to draw together key ways.
The distinction of Heterosexual and Homosexual bodies are important in the disappearing of gender non-conforming, queer and trans people because without it, there would be no difference
…show more content…
(Somerville 247). White males created the division called race just like homosexuality in a sense that it was the “wrong way of living”. She mentions, “discourses of race and gender buttressed one another often overlapping, in shaping models of the term homosexuality” (247). Race and sexuality are alike because they were created to divide people. Somerville asks “is it such a coincidence that when the imaginary boundary of black and white emerged, the topic of homosexuality and heterosexuality arose too” (245). Racism and homophobia is recognized as the same discrimination because it does the same thing to the oppressed group. The system works by condemning queer people for being non procreative and condemning African Americans for having too much sex. Both of these groups put together is the deviation sexual object choice and for most people, it’s not the right …show more content…
Wilkerson argues, “Sexuality, is nonetheless a culturally feared aspect of the body, with especially serious implications for those bodies perceived as falling outside a fairly narrow and right norm” (193). Erotophobia is defined as the fear of erotic topics. This can include: nudity, “sexual deviance”, sex shaming, and even the sexualization of young females for the purpose of empowering males. Erotophobia usually shows up in: schools, churches, and even in media. In media it is usually okay to see someone being stabbed to death but when it comes to nudity, it’s never appropriate. The way this practice disappears people that identify as queer is that it classifies their sexual practices as deviant; “sexual deviance in terms of unorthodox sexual desires” (195). Wilkerson also says,” Even less recognized is the strategic value of sexual stereotyping and other sexual harms as significant in perpetuating inequality in any oppressed group” (195). The more stereotypes are promoted the more it oppresses and divides a certain

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    The “Invention of Heterosexuality”, by Jonathan Katz, is an outline of his views on how heterosexuality and homosexuality are modern creations. His article traces the historical process by which these sexualities were created. The concept of “normal” and “natural” versus the “abnormal” and “unnatural” may seem self-explanatory and easy to define at first glance, but he offers a deeper insight into what he claims to be the ever-changing definitions of these four simple words. Were past centuries as sexually conservative as they have been perceived to be? Have there always been homosexual people or for a period of time were there only heterosexuals? How does…

    • 1403 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Whether it is bisexuals and trans* individuals on one side, with gay men and lesbians - both monosexual identities - on the other, or with bisexuals paired with gay men and lesbians as a cohesive group of deviant sexualities against heterosexism, or with bisexuals grouped with all of the other identities that ‘love men’ against lesbians, or with bisexuals against all monosexuals, the understanding of their identity sheds light on the dualistic nature of Western thought. Until the idea of ‘homosexual’ and ‘heterosexual’ became widespread in the United States and Europe, bisexuality could not even be considered. Even still, the binary way Western Culture perceives most things is incongruous with…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The focal point of this past unit has been the denial of sex and sexual themes around children. We discussed reasons why adults may attempt to shield children from all things sex. What we discovered, however, is that adults not only shield children from sexual themes simply because of their age and their perceived innocence, but they also attempt to control and rid their child of any gender “queerness” that does not fit into heteronormative and reproductive-oriented society, or their own views and ideals on “proper” boy-girl behaviour. “Curiouser: On the Queerness of Children” by Steven Bruhm and Natasha Hurley, analyzes and explains this paradox, yet I would like to have a more in-depth examination…

    • 942 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This is a shocking and disgusting display of Macionis’ intersectionalism theory, which he defines as an “analysis of how race, class, and gender interact, often creating multiple disadvantages for some categories of people,”. Similarly, Everyday Feminism candidly presents that “shifting attention to ‘gay’ as a singular identity, rather than the multiple oppressions that most survivors of hate violence carry distracts from the intersectionalities of race, gender, and sexual oppression,”. This statement goes hand-in-hand with Macionis’ work, and makes clear how easily minorities can be ignored and forgotten. Black Lives Matter could eradicate police brutality against African-Americans and the Gay Rights Movement could topple homophobic legislation, but instead of being able to rejoice with their brothers and sisters those caught in between the two groups are forced to withdraw to the…

    • 1065 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Heterosexism makes assumptions of the social norm; it is an internal way of keeping status quo. Having society be under the impression that there is only one way to explore sexuality creates an unsafe averment for those individuals who do explore beyond this mindset. There is the pressure of being heterosexual which can be explored through compulsory heterosexuality because individuals may not know that there are more options. The readings which dealt with sexuality helped me understand the importance of sexual education. In the narrative “Lusting for Freedom” by Rebecca Walker, I was able to understand the way which individuals should explore their bodies in a safe way without endangering themselves to sexually transmitted disease and the power through conductance, which can be gained from this exploration. There is also an existing double standard which affects many women (Gendered worlds pg. 103). The act of “hooking up” can enhance male’s reputation while hindering that of a female. Sex, gender, and sexuality are essential parts of an individual’s identity. When these areas are limited to certain roles and perceptive they restrain individuals. Moreover, they can generate certain roles, which, if individuals don’t fit, they can be ridiculed for. In every society, individuals are exploring their identities and having restrictions to their identity can hinder who these individuals are…

    • 2013 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The unequal rights for the male and female homosexuals shows that there is a double standard in the performance of gender identity. “Girls touched, hugged, and linked arms with other girls on a regular basis in a way that boys did…

    • 1316 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In the US, racism is more of a historical issue compared to other social issues, which making it becomes less important than others. Though we can still read a racial report from our news media every day, more social problems occur besides racism. In “Why it’s OK to Ignore Phil Robertson’s Racism,” John McWhorter doesn’t really ignore Robertson’s racial claim, instead he compared racism with sexuality that “discrimination against gay people is more overt in modern America than against black people.” Moreover, McWhorter emphasizes the seriousness of sexuality that “But there’s a difference between (racism) and ongoing, open comparison of gay people to animals, designating their sexuality as a sinful departure from basic human dignity, and families…

    • 1215 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Holden affiliates with two other men who display homosexual tendencies or are described as displaying them, Carl Luce and Mr. Antolini. Salinger purposefully connects the three males through their attraction to older women, which is possibly a means for the men and boy to conceal their true sexual desires. Carl Luce is dating a Chinese woman who is "in her late thirties" (Salinger, 145) while Antolini is married to a woman who was "about sixty years older" (Salinger, 181) than him. Holden himself is attracted to Mrs. Morrow, as seen through his personal observations of the woman. He said, "she was very good looking" (Salinger, 54) and "had quite a lot of sex appeal" (Salinger, 56). This affinity for older woman is not a coincidence but rather a conscious effort by Salinger to connect the three.…

    • 703 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This idea again brings up the concept of intersectionality, but also causes me to question societal categories. The author states: “Sex, gender, sexuality: three terms whose usage relations and analytical relations are almost irremediably slippery.” (Sedgewick 27). Sexuality and gender are lumped together as the LGBT+ community, even though they’re different identities. Perhaps it’s because being transgender and being gay are both straying away from norm. Gender and sexuality often intersect to result in certain behaviors; therefore, this concept could be why Sedgwick claims the identities are hard to separate. Similarly, feminism and anti-homophobia aren’t concerned with the same issues, but they do interact, primarily through gay and bisexual women. As a movement, both have fundamental goals of equality. Overall, these studies can’t be separated because they have similar foundations, even though they concern varying groups of…

    • 1052 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the last century, sexual, gender, and relational practices and norms have changed tremendously. With the sexual and gender revolution, people are no longer bound to lasting relationships with one another in order to have sex. Instead many individuals have shifted to short term hook-ups, at least for the early parts of their adulthood. While it may seem like people are foregoing marriage in favor for these short term relationships, young adults are still looking forward to getting married someday. Many teens and young adults believe that “they should explore different relationships [and] it may be foolish and wrong not to” (Regnerus 2011: 110). Dating and long term relationships are not in danger of becoming a thing of the past; rather people are pushing them off to later parts of their lives.…

    • 853 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The history of LGBT/queer communities does not exclude the impact of African-Americans that identified as such. Recovering the history of these figures marks importance in the practice of LGBT/queer history central to the United States as it uncovers the separate, but togetherness, of their cultures. This exposes the values and significance of culture, sexuality, and LGBT/queer representation. The history of gender and sexual identity as two different things is deeply rooted in their social construction. The complexities of these two can be seen through various definitions and viewpoints that have been laid out by different individuals, including people of power/authorities such as medical professionals, and those who have chosen to create…

    • 1042 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Hoey And Homosexuality

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages

    For centuries homosexuality was viewed as taboo but in actuality it has been present since the days of Alexander the Great. As of late people’s attitudes towards homosexuality have shifted in connotation. In the 1980’s, due to the HIV and AIDS epidemic gay men were looked down upon and isolated because people did not understand that the disease was sexually transmitted and could be given by direct contact. They just knew gay people were associated with the disease. These views contrast with new public attitudes towards homosexuality in 2015 when the Supreme Court ruled same sex marriage as legal in all states of the United States. As time has progressed public views on homosexuality have become widely accepted in the world. However, in the…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Unfortunately, sexual and gender identities continue to be the elements that shape the experience of power and rights in the United States, which affects the lives of several individuals. Perpetuation of homophobia in the American culture also highlights the shortcomings of our education system in leveling the playing field for all members of the society.…

    • 845 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Queer Anthropology

    • 1940 Words
    • 8 Pages

    In analyzing the intersections between race, gender, sexuality, class and nation, Boellstorff (2007:18) unpacks issues that have plagued queer anthropology since Kath Weston’s 1993 work ‘Lesbian/Gay Studies in the House of Anthropology.’ Boellstorff (2007) explores a plethora of things that impact upon queer anthropology, ranging from the objection to the name ‘queer’ anthropology, to ideas of globalism and cross cultural understandings of sexuality and non-normative practices. He argues that fundamental dichotomies and definitions of sexuality in western culture are divergent in others; particularly framing understandings of the terms ‘heterosexual’ and ‘homosexual’ as culturally constructed, by referencing the notion that for some, heterosexual may not be related to gender at all (Boellstorff 2007:26). His work also investigates the ‘inability to definitively fuse or separate sexuality and gender,’ and the consequences this may have upon ‘desire, embodiment and intersubjectivity,’ and argues that anthropological research has the potential to play an important role in solving the question of why the two categories are so often brought together (Boellstorff 2007:26).This exploration of gender and sexuality in anthropology informs his argument that non-normative sexualities have been under-studied in ethnography, and opens the door to the question of where queer anthropology is now, and if this gap has been closed since Boellstorff’s…

    • 1940 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Lgbt Community Reflection

    • 1236 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In our society sexuality is a popular yet controversial term. Several commercials, magazine and advertisements feed into using sex as an eye catcher to the product(s) being sold. As the term sexuality arises many think of either identifying as either being a heterosexual, lesbian, transgender or homosexual. Just as one word can trigger an individual to separate themselves into a category, society also places a strain on forcing people in social groups. Groups that are not limited to…

    • 1236 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays