Origin Of Bisexuality

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Bisexuality has been an ambiguous sexual identity. Due to the progressive transformation in the history of bisexuality, it has been difficult to distinctively define the term. This has resulted in many debates surrounding the distinctive historical formation of the term. It is necessary for us to comprehend the term bisexuality so that it can stand the test of time especially as the concept gains massive popularity in this day and age. Today, bisexuality is all around us and has become a dominant part of our daily lives and our popular culture. There are people who identify as being homosexual as they are only sexually and emotionally drawn towards persons of the same sex. Others are heterosexual and are only attracted to people of the opposite …show more content…
This does not imply that bisexuality did not exist prior to the 19th century, but that the ancient world was not as particularly concerned with the labels of sexuality. Bisexuality is most certainly not a modern notion and it has developed over time, even in many different cultures. It has been argued to predate all the way back to Ancient Greece where acts of bisexuality were most prominent amongst men who had wives or female lovers but were still engaging in extra marital affairs with their male lovers in the form of pederasty. Sexual orientation had not been a social identity, thus, these men were not categorized as homosexuals or bisexuals. Furthermore, Plato believed that humans spent their lives trying to find their other half, that led to either a same-sex or mixed union. This raises the issue pertaining to the dichotomy of sexuality as only having two forms of human sexuality despite Aristophanes’ claim that there are 3 sexes being male, female and hermaphrodite. Thus, the history of bisexuality is argued to have begun when sexologist Charles Gilbert Chaddock first coined the term bisexuality in his translation of, Krafft-Ebing’s book titled ‘Psychopathia Sexualis’, in 1892. Krafft-Ebing had labeled men and women who were attracted to both sexes as ‘psychosexual hermaphroditic’. However, historians such as Steven Angelides, argue that the …show more content…
New ways of understanding bisexuality were being put forward and this affected the formation of a distinct definition for the term. Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalytic theories occupied a prominent position in the 1920s. Freud proposed the idea that attraction to both sexes had its root in the developmental period of a human during which we are neither male nor female. Karl Heinrich Ulrich supported Freud’s theory as he claimed that a woman’s soul was trapped in a man’s body. However, this stereotype was eradicated when it was proven that sexual orientation took root in the developmental stage of a fetus. Another significant event that occurred during the 20th century that affected the history of bisexuality was the development of the Kinsey Scale, which had provided bisexuality with a new method to define itself. Kinsey’s Scale could also be seen as theorizing that we are all bisexual to some extent. The Kinsey scale was developed from reports by Alfred Kinsey that was based on thousands of interviews that were conducted in 1947 and 1953. The Kinsey Scale categorized human sexual behavior on a scale of 0 to 6, where 0 was representative of completely heterosexual and 6 being completely homosexual. Those who fell anywhere else on the scale were considered as bisexuals. The degree of bisexuality depended on where they fell on the scale of 1 to 5. Kinsey’s

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