Igneous Rock Formation

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For each sample, provide a detailed description, as precise of a rock name as you can, and an interpretation of the (possible) environment of formation.
Quaternary:
This is an igneous rock known as Tuff pyroclastic, which is a volcano-clastic rick composed mainly of volcanic ash. This conclusion makes sense as the quick cooling would cause the porous structures. This rock possesses sand to mud sized grains; therefore it is fine grained.
This rock has interlocking crystals as well as a predominately mafic structure.
This rock contains K Feldspar and hornblende due to splintery appearance of a black mineral
This rock formed close to the mountains in the erosional world. This is known because this rock was produced by the pyroclastic flow of
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At which point this geological region evidently experienced uplift. This uplift was due to a mountain building episode that occurred between the Silurian and the mid-metazoic. This event occurred when a continental crust collided with oceanic crust, at a convergent boundary, it causes crust to displace inland on the continental crust while the oceanic crust falls below the other plate via subduction. When subduction occurs the pressure from below causes volcanoes and mountains to form further inland. This would also explain why the rock formation in the Quaternary time period was a pyroclastic …show more content…
The formation of igneous rocks over time can accumulate to create mountain structures. As the magma piles up and cools structures gain matter, mass, and elevation. Over a long time this would create a mountain. This could happen at a relatively new volcano or at an ocean rift.

A mountain building episode, can occur when two continental crusts collide, at a convergent boundary, it causes crust to displace both up and down. Therefore when crust is displaced up any water in the affected area would be displaced pushing the sea level further out.

A mountain building episode, can also occur when a continental crust collides with oceanic crust, at a convergent boundary, it causes crust to displace inland on the continental crust while the oceanic crust subducts. Therefore when subduction occurs the pressure from below causes volcanoes and mountains to form further inland.

As crust collides isostatic rebound can further uplift by trying to balance out the thickening that just took place due to compression. This can lead to thinning of the crust material leading to structures of higher

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