Pros And Cons Of Socrates

Good Essays
Socrates fulfills the will of god by inquiring into the wisdom of people: “God orders me to fulfil the philosopher's mission of searching into myself and other men.” (Plato, 30).

Socrates’ accusers hate him because he “[...]went and tried to explain to [them] that [they] thought [themselves] wise, but [were] not really wise” (Plato, 23).
Socrates’ three main accusers are Meletus, Anytus, and Lycon.
Each of Socrates’ accusers represents a different thing. Meletus represents the quarrels of the poets of Greece, Anytus represents the craftsmen, and Lycon represents the rhetoricians.
Meletus and the others accuse Socrates of not following the gods of the state and corrupting the youth.
Socrates claims he is innocent by stating: “I have concealed
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Socrates is the sole corrupter.
Socrates shows the absurdity of this by asking, “Would you say this also holds true in the case of horses? Does one man do them harm and all the world good? Is not the exact opposite true?”(Plato, 26).
Socrates’ comparison of training horses refutes Meletus’ claim, that Socrates is the single corrupter of youth, by saying that horse trainers and horses are the opposite thereof, “[...] the trainer of horses, that is to say, does them good, and others[...] rather injure them?” (Plato, 26). This is the opposes Meletus’ claim. Horse trainers do horses good and everyone else does them harm. Socrates cannot be the sole corruptor of the youth, just as one man does not do horses harm.
Meletus is reluctant to answer because Socrates has disproved all his claims thus far.
Socrates uses Meletus’ reluctance against him by disproving Meletus’ claim that Socrates is the single corruptor of youth.

Socrates’ first question is “Do not the good do their neighbors good, and the bad do them evil? (Plato, 26). i. Meletus’ answer is “Certainly” (Plato, 26).
Socrates’ second question is “does anyone like to be injured?” (Plato,
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Meletus answers “Yes that I say emphatically.” (Plato, 27).
Socrates’ question is “Do you mean to say that I am an atheist simply, and a teacher of atheism?” (Plato, 27).
Meletus answers “ I mean the latter - you are a complete atheist.” (Plato, 27).
Socrates’ question is “Do you mean that I do not believe in the godhead of the sun or moon, which is the common creed of all men?” (Plato, 27).
Meletus answers “I assure you, judges, that he does not believe in them; for he says that the sun is stone, and the moon earth.” (Plato, 27).
Socrates’ question is “And so, Meletus, you really think that I do not believe in any god?” (Plato, 28).
Meletus answers “I swear by Zeus that you believe absolutely in none at all.” (Plato, 28).
Socrates’ question is “Can a man believe in spiritual and divine agencies, and not in spirits and demigods?” (Plato, 28).
Meletus answers “He cannot.” (Plato, 28).
Socrates’ question is “Now what are spirits or demigods? are they not either gods or the sons of gods? Is that true?” (Plato,

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