What Are The Advantages And Disadvantages Of The Canadian Electoral System

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The 2015 election had come to an end in October, with the Liberals concluding victorious under the “first past the post” electoral system. The Liberal party had surprised the voters with a victorious 39 percent vote, contrasting the expected Liberal minority supported by the New Democratic Party. It was expected that the Liberal party would not gain majority votes (over fifty percent), and they would negotiate with the New Democratic Party for support and in return promote their policies. Instead, the Liberal party had bewildered the conservatives and won majority of Quebec, gathering 36 percent of the votes and 55 seats for the Liberal party (Milner 2016). Justin Trudeau, current prime minister of Canada, presented several intriguing ideas …show more content…
This system offers independent minority political parties a better chance of being elected into parliament and compete at the political level, through the concept that voters rank candidates by preferences. As well, political parties and governments are required to achieve a consensus, ultimately leading to the likeliness of stable policies. In turn, this allows for the ideas of several political parties to benefit national interest of Canada, while receiving support from more than one political party (Theweek.co.uk, 2016). Contrasting the positive side, no electoral system is perfect and thus proportional representation also has disadvantages. Firstly, the idea that smaller parties have a better chance at being elected may not work under a Canadian political system, as the liberal party has a secondary support from the New Democratic Party voters. This, in turn, would create a liberal domination. As well, this system allows for unfavorable parties, such as bloc Quebecois, to have a better chance at being elected into parliament, which can have negative impact on the national interest of Canada, such as Quebec becoming a sovereign state. The agreement between parties in the electoral stage is also not always positive or ideal, as it may lead to negative compromises that in turn do not benefit the Canadian national interest. Yet, this system often …show more content…
The Canadian “first past the post system” is a prime example of how an outdated system does not reflect the national needs from an electoral system. This system only works efficiently when there are two parties running, since the runner who is elected is the one who receives the highest number of votes. However, Canada needs a system that will allow for separate parties and candidates to support each other and to gain a consensus of national needs. In turn, proportional representations offer independent minority political parties a better chance of being elected into parliament, and compete at the political level, as well requiring political parties and governments to achieve a similar agreement or consensus, ultimately leading to the creation of stable policies. These stable policies, in turn, allow for several political parties to have their ideas proposed and placed into action (Theweek.co.uk, 2016). Mixed-member proportional electoral systems allow for both majoritarian and proportional representation systems to benefit this electoral system, through the means of two votes for voters, allowing the voter to vote for the candidate they wish to elect and the party they wish to rule the House of Commons. This removes possibilities of less favorable parties and candidates supporting each other, as well

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