Personal Dilemmas In Julius Caesar, By William Shakespeare

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In Julius Caesar, written by William Shakespeare, the characters face numerous problems that they deal with in their own individual manners. Julius Caesar is well aware of his public image and he lets this influence his choices. Brutus is very aware of the power his decisions posses and therefore is very prudent. In contrast, the general public does not posses their own opinions making it nearly effortless to persuade them.
Julius Caesar becomes so concerned with how he is seen by others that his public and private persona become intertwined in a mix of emotions that he cannot fathom. In general, Caesar’s personality is viewed from two opposing perspectives. On one hand he puts the people of Rome’s needs before his own, but on the other
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An example of this is his choice to go to the senate to be crowned as the sole ruler of Rome. The night before Caesar’s wife, Calpurnia, has terrible nightmares and among the terrible events she sees the statue of Caesar gushing with blood as if it were a fountain. Calpurnia, who has never heeded to omens, begs Caesar to stay home for she says all these events portend his death. Eventually he agrees. However all Calpurnia’s begging is undone when Decius enters and states that the Senate was planning to crown him today and if Julius did not go they may change their mind. Julius Caesar then agrees. Caesar’s own selfishness and greed is what makes his own death inevitable. Despite all the warnings he dismisses them all because of his hunger for power. He even says, “How foolish do your feats seem now, Calphurnia!/I am …show more content…
Brutus posses a higher intelligence level than most in this play, for he thoroughly thinks through his actions including the consequences the actions may bring to others. One example of this is reasoning with himself on the idea of killing Caesar. Brutus us a dear friend of Caesar, and vice versa as well. Brutus has no personal motives for killing Brutus, whereas the other conspirators kill him out of jealousy and greed. Cassius simply misleads Brutus into thinking killing Caesar is for the good of the Roman people. Yet Brutus does not simply immediately agree with Cassius, instead Brutus ponders what would happen to Caesar if he got the crown. Brutus wonders, “But, when he once attains the upmost round/He then unto the ladder turns his back” (JC II i 25-26). Brutus suggest that if Ceasar would be crowned he would forget where he came from and all his fellow friends, including him, and instead of acknowledging his fellow Romans would instead scorn them. Brutus puts a great deal of thought into his choices but at the same time he puts his entire private life on hold and entirely focuses on public matters. Among the private matters

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