Rational Choice Theory Analysis

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A Brief Overview of the Rational Choice Theory When analyzing the rational choice theory, I remain committed to the opinion that crime is committed out of personal gain. There is this theory that tells us that people are able to make clear and concise decisions, knowing full well what those decisions are. This theory is known as the rational choice theory. Not only does the rational choice theory tell us people make the decision to do what they want to do when committing crimes, they are “rational” in doing so. Essentially, offenders are of complete mind and body when making the decision to commit crimes. This is closely connected with another theory that explains choice for gain, but hoping that gain does not result in maximized …show more content…
Since we have established that these offenders are making rational decisions, we should be able to sentence them appropriately, all the while, they understand the consequences for their actions. Secondly, by understanding their actions and theorists understanding why crimes are committed under the rational choice theory, we are better able to analyze reason by the offender for why they choose to do what they do. This helps us better deter crime in the future. “Unlike other approaches, however, which attempt to impose a conceptual unity upon divergent criminal behaviors (by subsuming under more general concepts such as delinquency, deviance, rule breaking, short-run hedonism, criminality, etc.), our rational choice formulation sees these differences as crucial to the tasks of explanation and control. Unlike existing theories, which tend to concentrate on factors disposing individuals to criminal behavior (the initial involvement model), the rational choice approach, in addition, emphasizes subsequent decisions in the offender’s career.” (Cullen, Agnew, Wilcox, 2014, p. …show more content…
The rational choice theory and the classical theory are very similar in their opinions as to why crime is committed. I have always felt, and still feel that crime is committed for the sheer pleasure and gain of the reward versus the risk. Sure, offenders can be caught, charged, convicted and sentenced, but this does not mean that offenders will stop committing crimes forever, which tells us that the rational choice theory may not apply to these offenders, but these would likely be offenders who a serial in nature and committing crimes that are more serious than those that mostly fall under the rational choice theory. I was unable to apply other theories throughout our readings to truly identify the most common reason as to why crime is committed, because it appeared that not only my opinion, but the actual research applied, was able to adequately back-up the true reason, which is personal gain. “Classical theory, people are rational and concerned with minimizing their pain and maximizing their pleasure.” (Cullen, Agnew, Wilcox, 2014, p. 27). While the rational choice theory explains, “crimes are broadly the result of rational choices based on analysis of anticipated costs and benefits.” (Cullen, Agnew, Wilcox, 2014, p. 437). I appreciate that the theorists behind the classical theory and the rational choice

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