Operation Market Garden Operations Plan

Amazing Essays
Introduction
September 17, 1944, Allied forces commenced the largest airborne operation, code name Operation Market-Garden, which took place in Holland in order to make way for Allied forces, both ground and air to advance through Holland into Germany. The scheme of the operation was an idea by Field Marshall Sir Bernard Montgomery, which he had convinced the Supreme Allied Commander, General Dwight Eisenhower in approving Operation Market-Garden, which called for a direct thrust towards the Rhine and Ruhr Valley utilizing large numbers of airborne paratroopers. This operation was against the Germans, which the Allied forces thought the Germans were retreating due to the movement of Allied forces at a quick pace from Belgium into Holland. Although,
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Because of the speed and tempo of Operation Market-Garden, the Allied forces were aware of the significance of their logistics reinforcement in the early stages of the plan and accounted for logistics support for both the air and ground operation, but did not incorporate ‘What Ifs’. While the operation continued, the adversaries were getting a consistent flow of reinforcements and supply from the rear, which paid dividends as the Germans was able to defend and hold Arnhem. This would be Germany’s last victory before V-E Day, the unconditional surrender of …show more content…
Having a shared and clear understanding of the operation from higher headquarters down to the lowest units will significantly lower the risk of flaws within the mission and will be beneficial in accomplishing the mission successfully. Identifying the enemy’s composition, capability, limitations, operational, and mission variables (PMESII-PT / METT-TC) will help in the planning and execution of the operation. Additionally, help the staff plan by War Fighting Functions (WfF) the best way the mission can be accomplished while meeting the commander’s intent.
Conclusion
In conclusion, Operation Market-Garden, the largest airborne operation during WWII by Allied forces, was the costliest, between 15,130 and 17,200 killed, wounded and captured. Having failed to capture the bridge over the lower Rhine at Arnhem, the operation was deemed a failure as the subsequent offensive operation into Germany could not continued. The failure of this operation has been attributed to factors, ranging from intelligence failures, overly optimistic planning, poor weather, and the lack of tactical initiative of commanders. This marked Germany’s last victory over the Allied forces before the end of

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