Nietzsche's Impact On Religion And Morality

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“On the sixth day, god created man. On the seventh, man returned the favor”-[Usenet]. Since ancient times, we, members of the human race, have adopted beliefs, ideologies, philosophies and religions. The religions adopted were concerning superior beings that oversee our lives, to protect us from harm, aid us in our struggles, and “shield us from ignorance”. Today we have adopted many religions, some more popular than others, that are handed down through generations. I have personally witnessed the passing of such beliefs throughout families, as a result of culture and tradition. However, before religion had merged with traditio0ns and customs, it was those who were the less fortunate, who lacked the stomach to independently assert their wants …show more content…
These virtues are evident today, as they are taught worldwide due to religion’s impact and influence of society. I, as well as my peers, have been raised with these virtues being the foundation of our morality. The first being slexlessness, which religion renamed purity. The second being weakness, which is renamed goodness. The third is submission to people one hates, which is renamed obedience. Finally, the fourth being not possessing the capability for revenge, which is renamed forgiveness. At this point, it is obvious why the first to convert and adopt Christianity, as well as other religions, are the spineless, who lack the stomach to take the necessary steps to improve their lives. Unsurprisingly, goodness, purity, obedience and forgiveness are the primary pillars of countless religions. I am confident in the saying, “Two working hands, are better than a thousand clasped in prayer”-anonymous. Moreover, Nietzsche’s third recommendation is: Never drink alcohol, which he stated as a result of the same reasons concerning why not to be a Christian; alcohol numbed pain, and consequently got in the way of people working to improve their lives. Well, the irony of the matter is, Islam prohibits us, its …show more content…
Several others would use the “No true Scotsman” fallacy to in their argument, saying, “Oh that person isn’t really Muslim if he’s cruel”, however, in truth, the person is, in fact, a Muslim, and a dick. In fact, many who I have met, who are strictly devout, happen to give off hints of hostility under the veil of religion. After all, “If the only thing keeping a person decent, is the expectation of divine reward, then brother, that person is a piece of shit”- True Detective. Furthermore, in numerous cases, the publicly known to be religious may take advantage of their influence; for instance, when a mosque or church asks for money in the form of donations, or even when people decide to “kill in the name of god”. “Even the devil can cite scripture for his purpose”-Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice [1:3]. Nonetheless, there are others whom religion provides a meaning to life, as well as motivation to get through life’s struggles. However, I consider this phenomenon to be sad as it exemplifies those who must resort to the supernatural for incentive. “You gotta get together and tell each other stories that violate every law of the universe, just to get through the god damn day”-True Detective. Nevertheless, Nietzsche understood the importance of religion in people’s lives, as a source of inspiration; still, Nietzsche believed a person could find

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