Nietzsche On The Genealogy Of Morality Summary

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In his On the Genealogy of Morality, Nietzsche presents a potent challenge to morality by saying that Morality is one kind of ethical system that promoting narcosis, calm and passive. It is created by hatred priests who are envying of Nobles’ power and strength and horrified of pain, struggle, and restlessness. It is hindering human flourishing now but yet necessary to help us get into a better post-moral society, finally, enable human flourishing. Nietzsche unfolds his argument by firstly categorize different kinds of ethical system. Secondly, he explains how they those systems change among society and why he claim morality is a new kind of ethical system different from the previous one. And finally, he gives some clues about what post-moral …show more content…
Nobles focus on themselves and define bad according to good while the priests focus on the other part and made the “evil” as fundamental quality, then define good regarding it. Priests say no to others(evil) and look at evil in resentment as if they are awful and terrible people. To cover their deepest hatred, priests invent the idea of free will; they claim the strong are free to be weak and they choose not to and the weak are free to be strong, but they choose not to. But Nietzsche believes that neither the weak nor the strong can become another. With the development of both society and morality, the priest(religious) portion of morality faded during the Renaissance. However, the moral core lived on, the hatred attitude toward “evil” didn’t go away …show more content…
Plato believes that justice is the virtue of human soul, it makes three part of the human soul: reason, spirit, and appetite in harmony thus eventually makes human function well and become blessed and happy. The “moral system” so called by Nietzsche is not a real morality, or at least not the morality(justice) discussed by Plato. Because those hatred Priests does not have a harmony soul. Their other parts of the soul are overpowered by spirit, the one in charge of protecting, revenging and anger. No matter what they call themselves, their soul does not function well, and they are not real human beings that are blessed and happy. So the system they created is not real justice. One the opposite, no matter what they call the nobles with good qualities(strong and courageous), long as they fully function their abilities(e.g. protect the nation), they are happy and blessed “good” people. Plato’s view of morality does not have the keywords “narcosis, calm, passive, horrified of pain.” Nor does it claim people are free to choose what to be. He believes that everyone has his/her own function, to function his/her function well is the major mission of this person and the main criteria to decide if he/she is happy and blessed(which is the consequence of being justice). Moreover, Humans’ flourishing is based on everyone function well, (or at least, the “top humans” function well). What Nietzsche

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