Multiculturalism And Canadian Identity

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Since the adoption in 1971, the Multiculturalism policy has been greatly debated about it’s expediency in Canadian society. Founded by settler two settler societies, Canada has been built on a foundation on cultural an ethnic diversity. Today, Canada has certainly become a nation of immigrants, but prior to the European colonization of Canada, a predominately homogenous ethnic group occupied Canada, the Aboriginals (or First Nations Peoples). Today after being dominated by Western European culture, Canada in now the home to a vast array of ethnic and culturally diverse peoples. Defining Canadian identity has proved to be a difficult task. This attributed to the sensitive balance, between cultural diversity, and national unity. The multiculturalism policy has been effective in promoting “tolerance” of different ethno-cultural backgrounds, but tolerance doesn’t mean acceptance and understanding. The often debated question is, Has Canada …show more content…
Nevertheless, before discussing how effective the multiculturalism act has been, it’s necessary to discuss parts of Canadian identity, and asses how multiculturalism shapes Canadian society. Canadian identity is ambiguous; often been describes described as an inclusive nation, rather than exclusive nation. Instead of promoting its own interest Canada has been known as a compromising, pace-making, compassionate nation filled with virtue. Canadian identity is closely associated with the promotion of diversity and multiculturalism. Unlike their American neighbors in the South, Canada is said to have embraced distinct cultures and language, without forcing in assimilation. This only makes sense that Canada’s culture has is more tolerant as a whole to diversity, for it was built on compromise which can all be related back to the Colonization and settlement of the British and French in the early

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