Essay On Canadian Immigration Policy

2063 Words 9 Pages
Immigration policies are comprised of the acts and regulations that affect which foreigners may enter the country and ultimately, be granted citizenship. Historically, Canadian immigration policies have favoured white immigrants. This preference is explicitly demonstrated through the classification of immigrants as ‘desirable’ and ‘undesirable’. Canadian immigration policies have been a major factor in shaping the development of the country, with policies being designed to fit the country’s economic needs of the time. Referencing the timeline of Ismaili’s four phases of immigration, this essay will support the critiques which state that Canada’s immigration policies, both past and present, have been discriminatory and racist in practice. …show more content…
During this period, Chinese immigrants were experiencing overt racism, particularly in British Columbia. British Columbia enacted laws restricting Chinese immigrants from obtaining liquor licenses and obtaining higher paying jobs. Chinese immigrants began to move eastward to escape this racism, however they were met with similar laws in other provinces. The idea behind these restrictions was that the Chinese were taking jobs that should belong to the white citizens of Canada (Zong and Perry). Pressure on the government by western provinces in particular resulted in The Chinese Immigration Act of 1885. This act imposted a $50 head tax on all Chinese immigrants coming to Canada. This amount increased until it reached $500. This wave of immigration showed a clear overt racism in Canadian society, which manifested itself in the institutional racist policies mentioned …show more content…
Immigrants in this fourth stage of immigration tend to com from developing societies. The problem with this, is that these developing countries will one day be developed. Further, as competition for skilled workers intensifies in developing and developed countries throughout the world. The points system means that immigrants allowed to enter into Canada are skilled and therefore employable in other developed countries. By selecting the most skilled immigrants, Canada also selects the individuals with the most flexibility to integrate into various parts o a global economy (Verbeeten). These individuals have the least incentive to stay in Canada, and may either return to their home countries or seek greater opportunities elsewhere. This paves the way for a brain drain in Canada, whereby the highly trained and most intelligent from a particular country emigrate elsewhere, usually with the motive of greater economic

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