Moral Judgement Definition

Amazing Essays
Does the claim that moral judgements are intrinsically motivating provide a good justification for non-cognitivism? The cognitive/non-cognitive divide posits that mental states and processes fall into either a category of perception which is analytical, or a category of attitude which is affective or impulsive. A moral judgement must be linked to some mental process, and according to some theories, moral facts in fact originate from mental processes. Moral judgements seem to stem from a certain conviction, which is easily interpreted as a belief which a person holds about what is true and good. However, the fact that moral claims can invoke a given attitude or sentiment, and act so compellingly, makes it evident that “non-cognitive” processes must be at play. Ayer points out that even the communication of moral judgements does not involve reasoning, but rather appeals to desire and motivation. Lastly, it appears implausible that both non-cognitive and cognitive processes are simultaneously the cause for holding a certain moral view. The …show more content…
Even if moral facts are sui generis (Moore, in Blackburn), and distinct from other facts about the natural world, they must still exert a sort of impulse on those who believe them, they cause spark a conviction that they are not only true, but that an ought should follow. (A similar problem exists in utilitarian philosophy, where usually not only one’s own happiness but the happiness of all people, or a given society, must be considered to be considered a reason to act a certain way.) Moore’s cognitivism claims that these supposed moral facts do carry this impulse or sentiment, but it is then unclear why it should be the intuited truth of the fact which is convincing rather than the impulse of the moral claims alone. The cognitivist account is not needed to explain the motivational force of a moral claim, and the reason why the claim is

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Rather, my point is that whatever process someone proposes as the process of justification should attempt or try to track truth. However, justification by theory-laden perception doesn’t remotely track truth, it actually allows any belief to be justified if it penetrates cognition, i.e. anything goes. Here’s an example from the moral domain to make clear why letting anything go in terms of justification is problematic. Assume that moral theory-laden perception is true.…

    • 1550 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    David Hume’s belief that morality is based on sentiment can be defined by the feelings of approval and disapproval one will have when they act. Hume argues that reason cannot discover moral truths but that sentiment is the basis of morality. I agree with Hume in the sense that one needs a feeling of approval or disapproval in order to motivate an action. Hume presents the argument that one's feelings is the basis of morality and that reasons, not reason alone, which is defined to be a cause or justification on why one may act, can not be the basis of morality solely because reason is already proved and can not be changed by influence. Reason also deals with matter of fact.…

    • 822 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Debunking Ethical Realism

    • 712 Words
    • 3 Pages

    And because it is possible that evolution did give us the mechanisms for our moral beliefs to track moral facts, simply stating that independent moral truths do not explain our moral beliefs is begging the question. The debunking argument makes such a statement, so it assumes that realism is false in order to prove that realism is false (20). It might just as easily be true that some moral beliefs are explained by moral facts, some by evolution, and some by a combination of both in which we have good reasons and evolutionary cause to believe something (23). At best, the debunking arguments reveal a challenge to realism, not a defeat of it. The proposed challenge would be to explain how we evolved to have the rational capacities that allow us to grasp moral facts and, as FitzPatrick also suggests, how we evolved the emotional capacities to grasp such facts (30-31).…

    • 712 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    From his view, any action done from self-interest are taken to be prudent rather than moral. Categorical imperative differed from the view of the maxim to greater extent. Maxim uses the majority and the practice of act to justify the morality even if the action goes against the right of others. According to Maxim, the morality of an action can only be determined by its practice. Assessing the consequences that may result from the action is key in such cases.…

    • 1177 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Moral Reasoning Theory

    • 1358 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The general human perception holds that personal behavior is under the guidance of moral reasoning. That is the reason people refer to individual behavior as immoral, it is different from the conventional moral. Psychologists have been making moral evaluations and moral inferences to establish the psychological facts on moral reasoning. However, a common thing in their studies is the need to develop one theory on moral reasoning processes. The journal article begins by making an explanation of main psychological theories regarding human moral decisions.…

    • 1358 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Is it the golden rule of treating others the way you would want to be treated? Acting on impulse because it feels good? Or doing your duty because it is your “job” to do so? One cannot determine what is "right" and what is "wrong"; it must be taught or shown to us by means of common sense and unified agreement. At the same time, influence of the self- its own interests, wants and needs- play a bigger role in what creates ones ' moral standpoint.…

    • 1398 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This account of moral knowledge differs from other accounts given because of the way it views morality and what it deems as morally right. Consequentialism said that morality of an action depend on its results. If good came out of the action, despite the fact that the fact may be questionable, then what the person has done is morally right. Kant’s duty based ethics view said that morality was based on intentions that were universalizability. Virtue ethics deems that morality is gained through experience, training, and…

    • 798 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Rationality meaning one 's judge of values and one 's guide to action.“Settle, for sure and universally, what conduct will promote the happiness of a rational being.”( Kant) Kant first starts by arguing that we are indeed responsible for what we do. The actions that we take are not just a set of events that we have no control over. Other philosophers believe that they are just another set of events that are determined by the things we cannot control. He also bases morality as a matter of duty that is common sense. Whether we feel against or not we know the morally right thing and it’s our duty to care out our action.…

    • 881 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Kantian ethics, the moral philosophy established by Immanual Kant in his work Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, is centered around the idea of the “categorical imperative”, the principle that certain actions are strictly prohibited, despite the potential for the prohibited action to bring about more good than the alternative. Kant believed that since humans have the ability to reason, they must use their rationale to determine what these unwavering truths, or moral duties, are. For Kant, if humans act in accordance with these moral duties, and not out of preference, instinct or desire, they are in turn acting with moral worth. This ethical outline can be applied to the case of Ben and Tyler, two buddies whose friendship is…

    • 905 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    2, pg608). This means that if all moral views have the same potential to be true or ‘right’ then we must give equal weight to views that we do not agree with as being ‘right’, it means we cannot criticise rapists or assaulters because their behaviour is based on their moral ideas and they must be holding those beliefs sincerely and believe them to be true. Therefore, meaning that meta ethical subjectivists believe that moral judgements are just the vocalisation of taste, however the taste for ‘wrong’ things such as wanton cruelty is not considered worse than a taste for kindness (Reason and Responsibility, Feinberg and Shafer-Landau, 2015, part 4, chpt. 2,…

    • 922 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics