Mondrian Abstract Art Analysis

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• Honestly, to understand and interpret art is actually very challenging. In addition, when it’s abstract art I admit that understanding abstract art can be very challenging. Like you can keep staring at them for days and still don’t get a single right thought what the artist is actually trying to convey to us. Abstracts are less immediate and less accessible. Mondrian’s abstract art is the type where he takes his image out of the realm of realism. We still can figure out the theme, but it is very unreal. Our eyes actually never experienced such images in this real world. There are a lot of color schemes, perspective, and proportions. Mondrian’s artwork is abstract and very intellectual. For example, the Grey Tree (1912) is a form of tree, but it’s not the exact same we would see in nature. Mondrian …show more content…
If a person is actually interested in abstract art he should probably want to see the artwork without knowing the goal of it. He would want to discover himself rather than knowing the theme and then put his views which would be in according to what he already knows. He would first want to see the artwork and think if he likes the image or not. What does he feel about this image? What colors are used? How these colors communicate with it? How did the artist create this? Is this work, inviting or off-putting? He would want to invent his imaginations about the image rather than knowing the entire plot behind it. At the same time, there would be people that would find a very hard time in actually trying to understand the art. Like what are these unreal types of arts showing us? These artworks make no sense at all for them. They need some explanation to get along the image and start searching for the deeper roots of it. They would feel unfair that they have been put into a situation of appreciating an art and acknowledging it without giving any artistic

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