Essay On Westward Expansion

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Nineteenth century America saw much expansion west. People from every state sought to travel out west for various reasons. Some would travel out west for a promise of new life, some sought gold, and others desired to cultivate the vast land. The trials, hardships, and obstacles facing settlers did not deter them; even if it meant clearing out the natives living in those regions. Robert May, writer for PBS, writes that the leading factor driving expansion was Manifest Destiny, the idea that the expansion of the United States was ordained by God. This would later be corrupted, and used for the benefit of those trying to obtain land (May) The inevitable expansion of the U.S. was spearheaded by the negative idea of Manifest Destiny, which became the belief that the obtainment of land had no repercussions. The abhorrent treatment of the Native Americans was the primary result of Manifest Destiny; and religion, racism, and politics justified this treatment. Some said …show more content…
If the Natives were given a fair share for the land and were allowed to coexist with the Americans, then Manifest Destiny expansion would not be seen in such a terrible light. Thinking of the Indians as equals would have not caused the white settlers to treat them so harshly. It was only in execution that America’s expansion west is reflected on so poorly.
The way Manifest Destiny played out was despicable, but the notion of expansion was quite viable. With an ever growing populace, the United States needed to expand, but not in the way that it was carried out. If fair treatment was given to the Indians, to coexist with them, then the migration out West be seen as the true great decision that it could have been. By providing more farm land, and taking control of land that foreign nations would had likely colonized anyway, the colonization of those lands proved beneficial to the

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