Malthusian Prophecy Research Paper

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Malthusian Prophecy As a child growing up in the Michigan winters, I grew fond of the snow. As I grew older, the winters seemed to become less intense in regards to frequency and amounts of snowfall. Perhaps this was confirmation bias at work. However, I recently asked my father if he had ever told himself or others, “We don’t have winters like we used to.” He humbly replied yes, that he had thought about it. That is an example of global warming. It wasn’t just my confirmation bias at work; it was real. My time on this earth has been far shorter than my father’s, yet one can still observe climate change on this earth over the course of a decade or two, even if the overall results are diminished. So in my time of remembering playing in the Michigan snow from age six to eighteen, I was in fact able to observe a mellowing of the winter’s intensity. The Southwest United States is a rapidly growing region. Places such as Phoenix Las Vegas, and Los Angeles/San Diego (SW CA) rely heavily upon the water flowing from the Colorado River. The river’s source originates from the snowpack from the Rocky Mountains. In more recent years however, that snowpack has begun to thin. The snow comes in later in the year than ever before, and melts earlier, leaving less water for the rest of the year, while extending things …show more content…
California holds one of the most fertile grounds for agriculture on the entire planet and feeds about half the country with much more going to export. Yet it is only accessible via irrigation; this in turn is reliant upon the Colorado River. Food is our most valuable export in the United States, feeding around two billion people. Imagine the global repercussions if the US were incapable of supplying food to this many people when the global population is only growing. We could be looking at mass starvation and death as well as an insignificant loss in Gross Domestic

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