Critical Race Theory: A Case Study

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Along the lines of Critical Race Theory Lewis-McCoy also offers us a race-based explanation for the inequality found in the results of minority students. He observed that black children grow up seeing the race-related barriers that black adults have faced. these barriers then signal to the children that the traditional opportunity system is not open to blacks. Black youths then increase their sense of racial allegiance and solidarity. They often become disengaged from school, because they recognize school as a vehicle of mobility, but one that is exclusive to whites and not for blacks (Lewis-McCoy, 2014). This mentality in black students psychological can bar minority students from reaching their potential and serves as yet another barrier …show more content…
To do this we will first look at Lyndon B. Johnson’s solution in his ambitious Great Society program. Following the beginning of southern desegregation and the attention brought to unequal schools from the landmark Brown V. Board of Education Supreme Court case, President Johnson established Title I funding, which attaches extra money from the federal government to low-income students in an attempt to make low income schools more equal. However, the legacy of Title I is less stellar than expected. One time presidential nominee to be Commissioner of Labor Statistics, Dr. Marvin Kosters and Brent Mast, a statistician for the U.S. Department of Justice, studied the long term effects of Title I funding and found that, “After more than thirty-five years of experience and numerous careful efforts to evaluate its performance, the evidence has failed to demonstrate that Title I programs have been systematically and significantly contributing to reducing disparities in achievement by improving the performance of its beneficiaries” (Kosters, et al., …show more content…
Economist and Professor of Education at Boston University, Dr. Marcus Winters, published a study in 2012 where he reported his findings on Florida, he found that, “among the 50 states, Florida’s gains on the National Assessment of Educational Progress between 1992 and 2011 ranked second only to Maryland. Florida’s progress has been particularly impressive in the early grades. In 1998, Florida scored about one grade level below the national average on the 4th-grade NAEP reading test, but it was scoring above that average by 2003, and made further gains in subsequent years” (Winters,

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