Jazz Music Research Paper

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Jazz is known as one of the most influential forms of music in the history of the United States. Jazz began when one of the most historical wars, World War I, had just ended. It has many origins, from New Orleans to Kansas City to Memphis. New Orleans is the main center from where many of the influential pieces and origins were located. A big part of the development of jazz came from a lot of people who went to many bars and warehouses. What had made jazz be seen as a different perspective of its own traditional music was its own act of improvising. The first of the jazz bands contained pieces of different instruments to make a unique sound. Some of those instruments include, drums, banjos, string bass, and even guitars. A lot of the song …show more content…
He was a trumpeter, a band leader, a soloist, a comedian, a singer, and a film star. Armstrong was well known for his songs, “What a Wonderful World” and “Star Dust”, as well as some others. Joe Oliver was a mentor to Armstrong and he was showing him tips and pointers on how to use the horn and also used him as a substitute. His reputation as being a musician began to flourish around the 1920’s. because his music began to flourish, he was able to stop to work for manual labor jobs and put full concentration on dances, parties, and playing his cornet.
Around 1922, Armstrong received a call from Oliver to come with him to Chicago to join his Creole Jazz Band. He made his first recording with Oliver and created a solo song called “Chime Blues.” “From 1925 to 1928, Armstrong made more than 60 records with the Hot Five and, later, the Hot Seven. Today, these are generally regarded as the most important and influential recordings in jazz history; on these records, Armstrong 's virtuoso brilliance helped transform jazz from an ensemble music to a soloist 's art” (Editors, B.). He had also begun scat singing with his widely known vocal on the record “Heebie
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He was a major piece in the history of jazz music and his career lasted for more than 50 years. During his span, he composed thousands of songs for everyone to hear. His fame rose when he composed several masterworks in the 1940’s. those works included “Cotton Tail” and “Ko-Ko.” “Some of his most popular songs included "It Don 't Mean a Thing if It Ain 't Got That Swing," "Sophisticated Lady," "Prelude to a Kiss," "Solitude," and "Satin Doll” (Duke Ellington Biography). Duke Ellington’s sense of musical drama was the one that made him stand out from all of the rest. He then was able to earn 12 Grammy awards from the years 1959 to

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