Glenn Miller's Jazz Standards

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Jazz began in the late 18th century in African-American communities in New Orleans. Soon these vocal tunes made by African-Americans turned into piano songs, and soon enough evolved into the Jazz we know and love today. In modern Jazz, there are pieces that are considered “Jazz Standards”, one major contributor to these standards is the trombone player and Big Band Jazz composer, Glenn Miller. Glenn Miller lived a short yet interesting life, he differed from his competitors and left a dazzling legacy on the Jazz community. On March 1st of 1904 in the small town of Clarinda, Iowa, Alton Glenn Miller was born. Miller began playing the cornet and mandolin at a young age. This sparked his love for music. In 1917 Miller finally received his very …show more content…
In the military, he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal. The bronze star is according to the americanwarlibrary.com, “The Bronze Star Medal is awarded to any person who, after December 6, 1941, while serving in any capacity with the Armed Forces of the United States, distinguishes himself or herself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight.”, which is quite an honor for military members. After Miller’s death, he had several songs added to the Grammy Hall of Fame, the songs being “Moonlight Serenade”, “Chattanooga Choo Choo”, and “In the …show more content…
In his lifetime he dropped out of college, joined multiple bands and orchestras, created his own orchestra, and joined the military. When he joined the military he gave up nearly $20,000 weekly income to serve his country and give the troops something to fight for, and that was a sense of home from Miller’s military band. On top of his extremely successful life, he left a remarkable legacy on Jazz Music. He changed the way music is written by putting the expression on the paper, rather than leaving it up for interpretation. Miller also changed the way Jazz music is written by changing the set-up of the orchestra. He changed it so the clarinets would have the melody, saxophones had the harmony, and then the brass was added for countermelodies. He also inspired many musicians by his drive for his desires and will never allow “no” for an answer. Glenn Miller lived an interesting life, was different from the other Jazz Standards, and left a long-lasting legacy in Jazz

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