Louis Armstrong: Jazz's Effect On The Entertainment Industry

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Louis Armstrong used jazz to change the music world and left a lasting effect on the entertainment industry. Armstrong was born in New Orleans to fifteen year old Mary Ann and twenty year old Willie. His whole life, Armstrong identified his birthday as July 4, 1900. It is now know his actual birth date was August 4, 1901. Armstrong’s young parents were not ready for a child so Josephine, Willie’s mother, raised him until he was five. Over those five years, Armstrong did not see much of his parents. He returned to visit his mother when she was very sick. He stayed to help take care of her at her bedside. That was when he found out that his parents had separated, but were still living together. For the next six years, he lived with his mom …show more content…
Armstrong was an originator of scat singing and influenced the way all popular music developed. He continuously broke race barriers by being the first African American to host a sponsored, national radio broadcast, and being the first African American superstar. Armstrong’s charisma and wit led him to becoming an iconic entertainer, inspiring generations for decades. Armstrong gave jazz a direction and a purpose. He utilized something he called “rhythmic freedom” along with improvisation in his music that let his creativity shine. A lot of artists today still use the same idea today but it is now known as “tempo rubato”. He demonstrated this concept best in his song Heebie Jeebies. The musical techniques Armstrong displayed in this song shaped the new development of jazz music. He was also the originator of “cutting sessions”, where musicians got together for musical battles on the spot. These were contests of imagination and musical talent. Armstrong had a passion for these contests and seldom lost. The sessions eventually evolved into jam sessions, where musicians play together and bounce ideas off each other but do not necessarily compete. This evolution was an important stepping stone to the building of music and imaginations of

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