Little Bighorn Case Study

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In the Little Bighorn Battle on June 1876 between the Lakota and Cheyenne people verse the United States. The conflict was the cultural change and clash between the two: on one hand there is the Lakota and Cheyenne were they are buffalo/horse people, and on the other hand there is the United States is industrial/agricultural people. From 1868 the US and Lakota negotiated on the Fort Laramie Treaty; however, that made conflict towards the other tribes (National Park Service Website). This conflict was not just to each tribe but made a conflict from the US to the rest of the tribes that did not sign the treaty. After this US tracked down the Lakota and Cheyenne to force them into the treaty, in turn starting the Little Bighorn Battle. Years after the battle the Lakota and Cheyenne are stay negotiating with the United States to get their land back. From that year the Lakota 's are trying to get their land back form the United States used negotiation and the US court system. The mean land that their want is Black Hill Mountain and this is a …show more content…
317-22) in this case the battle of Little Bighorn was just the start and over the last hundred years the escalation has increased and decreased. In fact in 1973 the established American Indian Movement (AIM) to rally support for their cause and "AIM occupied Wounded Knee Cemetery on Pine Ridge Reservation to alert the world about the vested economic interest the U.S. government held in the Hills and the extent to which that interest governed U.S. governmental policy and federal court cases regarding their land" (The Federal Government and the Lakota Sioux). More on the side of de-escalation is where we find that the U.S. would start to listen but go against what was said and take more land or like today with the pipeline of breaking it up so that it is not a national project so they 're not doing a geological survey 's (RT Question

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