Summary: The Cheyenne Native American Dull Knife

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The Cheyenne Native American Dull Knife once said, “All we ask for is to live and live in peace” (332). The quote exemplifies the relationship between the Native Americans and the United States government. The Native Americans did not agree with the American settlers coming into their territory and using their beloved natural resources. As more policies were enacted and more settlers came into the unsettled territories inhabited by the Native Americans, the more likely a violent dispute between the two sides would occur.
The more Americans that began to settle in Native American territories, the more likely the United States government would uproot the Indians from their native lands. For example, “...Granger said that the government wanted to move the agency from Canáda Alamosa to Fort Tularosa in the Mogollons.” In response to this proclamation Cochise said that Fort Tularosa was too far away and flies would be damaging to the horses (210). The government saw the Native Americans as obstacles in their way that needed to be transferred. In the case of Captain Jack’s tribe, the government decided they should move north to a reservation in Oregon where each family would have everything that they needed. The result of this was placing these Modocs in the Klamath’s territory where their supplies were stolen by the Klamaths (221). This example shows the government made promises, but did not make sure they were strong and could be carried out in a successful manner. Alternatively to finding hospitable land, the government placed the natives in undesirable areas with little protection from
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Instead of doing what was best for the Native Americans, the policies created relocated many Indian tribes to undesirable areas. Although the United States gained more land and natural resources through these policies, they were very harmful to the Native

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