Non Abused Children Literature Review

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Literature Review

Abused vs. Non-abused Children: In Children ages 6 to 12 there are some similarities and differences between those who had normal growth and those who were abused. Children who have normal growth will experience aggression from the age of 2 ½ to 5 when situations like a toy missing or inefficient space arise. His or her aggression eventually ends and the next phase begins 6 to 7 years of age. This is where the child will become less aggressive and starts enhancing social skills, communication patterns, and cooperative abilities. Children start to become less egocentric individuals and start building empathy for other people. Anxiety is common among children in a light connotation. They stress about being away from parents
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This concept was an individual’s distortion of a negative event that has happened in the person’s life to reduce the psychological effects. The distortions that occur usually do so in the unconscious mind, which Freud spoke about quite a bit in his career. Freud recognized six different defense mechanisms that occur that characterize human behavior, as well as, cognitive behavior. A brief description of each …show more content…
In each study and article that was used in this paper shared that the formation of defense mechanisms were more common than not in individuals. In most cases the individuals did not even recognize that they had developed a defense mechanism. In some other cases some individuals did not even recall being abused because of the formation of the defense mechanisms. Treatment is imperative for individuals that have been assaulted and formed these mechanisms because they are not always healthy for the individual and can escalate into serious health issues and mental disorders. There is still more to do to gain understanding about the implementation of defense mechanisms in individuals who have experienced trauma. The prevalence of this issue is still rising, and hopefully better understanding and treatment will help these individuals cope healthy with their experiences, so they can have an improved quality of

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