Literary Analysis Of Anne Lamott's Shitty First Drafts

779 Words 4 Pages
“This is pure garbage. Was I drunk when I wrote this?” These are both common thoughts that cross my mind when reviewing and analyzing one of my drafts. The art of writing, by no means, is a simple task, and nearly every individual, at some point, encounters this obstacle in their lifetime. For some this skill may come easy, creating literature from scrap within hours is a simple task. On the other hand, most find this process extremely difficult; thinking of new ideas, words and sentences in sequence is challenging. Forming thoughts and putting them into paragraph form takes time, and not only time, but also countless attempts. Anne Lamott explains this problem in her essay, “Shitty First Drafts,” in which she argues that every writer, even …show more content…
This essay stands out in my mind because of its relatable topic; pretty much everyone at some point or another has struggled with writing, whether they care to admit it or not. Lamott realizes this, which spurred her on to trying to help audiences to realize that no one writes perfectly at first, and that brainstorming by write without caring inevitably breeds perfection. First drafts, as Lamott reveals, are “The child’s draft, where you let it all pour out and then let it romp all over the place, knowing that not one is going to see it and that you can shape it later” (222). For instance, whenever a person starts a new writing, thousands of thoughts and words are echoing through their heads. Not knowing where to begin or what to first write down. Lamott relates to her audience and other writers alike by revealing her own experiences with these similar feelings. First drafts remain an essential starting aspect of the writing process that everyone must undergo. Audiences who read Lamott’s essay will agree that it teaches readers to be more excepting of their own writing and thus confident in what they …show more content…
The way Lamott explains how a first draft is the down draft, is something I find very interesting, yet struggle with in my own writing. I often struggle with being emotionally stable towards my work; never thinking it is good enough. At times it’s pure bliss and excitement over the creation which I have achieved, and other times its immense hatred toward the writing, or the assignment alike. I often struggle with simply getting my ideas down on paper no matter how incoherent they sound. When I take the time to prepare really rough first draft, get all my thoughts on paper, and revise, my stress level is severely reduced, and my emotions, along with paper quality, are greatly enhanced. Most writers experience the fear of first draft at some point in their career, or maybe even all the time. Anne Lamott simply states to relax and to begin writing, “Just get it all down on paper, because there may be something great in those six crazy pages” (222). Similarly, no matter what comes to mind; whether it exhibits good or bad qualities, something amazing maybe lurking in the gibberish that is the first

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