John Locke's Influence On Politics

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As one of the most influential philosophers of his times, John Locke's concepts still remain to have a significant impact on current politics. His political theory was based on the concept of self-ownership and he argued the every person has a right to own their property. In addition to this, he believed that the government's main role should be limited to protecting its citizens and their property. Locke was also noted for his writing entitled “Letters Concerning Toleration ” (Locke, 1689) in which he advocated the right to freedom of conscience and religion. In this paper I would like to introduce the most important political theories of John Locke and what impact they have on current politics.

Locke's political theories served as a fundamental
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While he acknowledges the importance of liberty, he believes that people should entrust authorities entirely with the judgment. What is more, people have to obey the judgment of the magistrate as they are driven by the good of public welfare, not by self interest. The ruler, however, has to be wise and impartial. Only then the judgment can be fair and just. Locke does not hide his distrust with masses as he believes that it is much better to put the power in the hands of a small group or individual rather than the whole community. He was also of the opinion that if people are given too much freedom of choice when it comes to religion, it will only create destruction, and chaos. Thus, the magistrate should do their best to ensure peace between people and to protect public good. Naturally, they should abide to the rules themselves, be orderly and decent, and not be motivated by private interest but conversely, by the nation's good. Overstepping some boundaries to ensure the peace within the nation, is acceptable as there has to be some great, ruling power. Naturally, every person has liberty over their conscience and if someone was to limit or deprive them of that, they are considered to be exhorting their power. So, if the magistrate is willing to pass some legislation, they need to consider whether the new law will not infringe people's right to judge. However, Locke also believed that as ecclesiastical rules deal with ceremonial practice, they are unlikely to limit people's

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