Jean Piaget's Theory Of Child Development

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In this article i’m going to talk about a Theorist named Jean Piaget. He is a theorist of child development. His child development focuses on the ways the children come to know oppose to what they know. He also believes that thinking is different in each stage level. Children naturally attempt to understand things they do not know. Knowledge is gathered gradually during active involvement in real life.

The first stage is the Sensorimotor stage. This stage takes place between the ages of birth and two years. Infants use all their senses to explore and learn. Sensory experiences and motor development promote cognitive development. Baby 's’ physical actions, such as sucking, grasping and hitting, help them learn about their surroundings. The
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his theory of cognitive development focuses on predictable cognitive (thinking) stages. He also believed that thinking was different during each stage of development. His theory explained mental operations. This includes how children perceive, think, understand, and learn about their world. Piaget believed that children naturally attempt to understand what they do not know. Knowledge is gathered gradually during active involvement in real- life experiences. By physically handling objects young children discover that relationships exist between them. Piaget used terms to describe them. They are called the schemata, adaptation, assimilation and …show more content…
The schemata is a mental representations or concepts. As children receive new information they are constantly creating, modifying, organizing, and reorganizing schemata. So as the children are learning new things they are putting it with the information they already know.

The second term is adaptation. Adaptation is the term piaget used for children mentally organizing what they perceive in their environment. What new information or experiences occur, children must adapt to include this information in their thinking. If this new information does not fit with what children already know, a state of imbalance occurs. To return to balance, adaptation occurs through either assimilation or accommodation.

Assimilation is the process of taking in new information and adding it to what the child already knows. So when the child goes to school and learns something new like to tie his/her shoes they will put that with what they already know so they can keep repeating the behavior over and over.

Accommodation is adjusting what is already known to fit the new information. This process is how people organize their thoughts and develop intellectual structures. In this term the child will learn something new it adjust the information to what they already know so it is basically just categorizing the

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