Jean Paul Sartre Existential Humanism Analysis

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This paper offers an analysis of Jean-Paul Sartre perspective of ‘existential humanism’ in order to argue that this view of existential is very optimistic and it poses a problem for individuals. The central theme in Sartre’s work is that man is born into a void where there is nothing, including God. As a result, man creates the self and his essence. The free choices he makes. In making choices, man is not only committing to himself but to all of mankind. In Sartre’s existentialism, “existence precedes essence”(page 3) is a guiding principle, meaning nothing predetermines a person’s goals and character. The individual defines his or her own essence. According to Sartre, “man first of all exists, encounters himself, surges up in the world– and …show more content…
My answer to that is yes, he did solve the problem because individuals are free and they should discover their authentic self. The reason for yes is because it intertwined the concept of existentialism and humanism in a way, which leads directly back to optimism and it reminds an individual that there is no legislator, but himself/herself is humanly generated by the choices they make. Moreover, within existentialism, actions are of equal moral value; inaction is problematic. The being-for-itself uses despair to embrace freedom and take meaningful action in full acceptance of whatever consequences may arise as a result.
The enduring and long-lasting influence of Sartre’s work is in its concepts of individual choice and responsibility for those choices. He cites experience as the starting point for knowledge and believes his is an updated view of humanism. The heart of Sartre’s philosophy leaves little room for dispute. His readers and followers are, by virtue of his philosophy, open to bring to it whatever meaning they choose, because meaning is a subjective matter. A man, according to Sartre, who first exists and finds himself/herself submerged in the world, can then define himself/herself. Objects have a purpose. They are invented to serve a function. A person does not have the same type of essence. An individual simply arrives on earth with no predetermined plan or meaning. As a result, they must find that for

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