Janes And Elizabeths Relationship In Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

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One of the most famous is Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Darcy’s and Elizabeth’s relationship is by far the best one in her story. Seeing the two characters grow from the mutual dislike they had for one another to the point where they fall in love and get married is an incomparable and wonderful thing. Darcy’s and Elizabeth’s relationship is so relatable because of the struggles they face, which is part of what makes the story so great. The couple had to go through a lot of issues like Darcy’s pride, Elizabeth’s mistaken ideas, the difference in their social standings, and more before they could finally be together.
One of their first issues was Mr. Darcy’s pride and treatment towards people he thought below him because it gave Elizabeth
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96.) This is later found out to be a lie when Elizabeth accuses Darcy of just this and he then explains to her in a letter what had happened. Darcy’s father had left Wickham a thousand pounds to help him become a clergyman but Darcy knew that Wickham should not be a clergyman and made a deal with him stating that “He resigned all claim to assistance in the church, were it ever possible that he could ever be in a situation to receive it, and accepted in return three thousand pounds.”(p.
238) This seemed to be the end of any connection between the two because Wickham lived a
“life of idleness and dissipation” (p. 238.) After he had used all of the money Darcy had given him, Wickham tried asking for his original promise and Darcy refused because he felt he did not deserve it. Also in the letter, Darcy explains his reasoning for convincing Mr. Bingley to not marry Jane. Darcy was mistakenly convinced that Jane did not feel as strongly for Bingley as he felt for her and merely wanted to protect his friend. Elizabeth’s wrong opinion of Mr. Darcy held them apart more than anything. When she finally understood why he did all of the things
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On many occasions, the Bingley sisters made fun of the Bennet family and showed their disapproval of Jane and Elizabeth ending up with either
Bingley or Darcy. Darcy himself even acted like he was above her at times. In one instance, he refused to dance with Elizabeth or any other woman at the ball he and Bingley first attended while in town. Then, later on he brings it up when trying to propose to Elizabeth. Darcy began his proposal by speaking of how he tried in vain to not love her but how he could not help himself. He talked about how much and how long he had loved her. However, he also dwelled on the fact that her family was inferior to his and on the obstacles that had caused him to want to deny his feelings for her. When Lady Catherine heard rumors of Mr. Darcy wanting to marry
Elizabeth, she paid the young Ms. Bennet a visit to express her disapproval and convince her not to marry him. Lady Catherine tells Elizabeth that she must not marry Darcy because she is not high enough in society to be considered good enough for him, Elizabeth disagreed and informed
Lady Catherine that she will marry Darcy if she pleased. Lady Catherine’s reply is “I am

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