James Knox Polk: Architect Of Manifest Destiny

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James Knox Polk: Architect of Manifest Destiny James Knox Polk, a man often labeled by his weaknesses, emerged as the first “dark horse” candidate, but proved himself to be the complete opposite (Pinheiro par. 2). Polk was a rare president who not only stated his goals, but clearly achieved them for the interests of the bipeds. Although statements of “Who is Polk?” began to inundate the country, Polk successfully achieved his dreams of taking office, and in fact, became the nation's most propitious one term president of the Pre-Civil War Era. Shaped by early experience in political power, years on the Tennessee frontier, and political and social shifts in society, James Knox Polk emerged into the struggling American society as a promising …show more content…
He immediately entered the University of North Carolina and graduated with honors, becoming a preeminent scholar of his class. (“Early Life and Career” 162). Polk secured a job as a clerk of the state senate, making it a very wise move for the studious, inexperienced man, who by then had used various law and statehouse connections as stepping stones to his future career as a politician (Pinheiro par. 4). His ambitions of a political aspirant were influenced by his adherence towards his mentor Andrew Jackson, in turn, earning him the label of “Young Hickory” (par …show more content…
Henry Clay and William Carroll agreed that Polk is a young man of “sprightly talents”, who will continue in congress for several more years to come, and may even have “a share of influence in the political concerns of the state” (Borneman 23). Henry Clay would soon become incredulous towards the unfamiliar man who was yet to become his adversary candidate. James Polk, a man who had his talents doubted by the nation, soon became the unexpected man who future candidates saw as a competitor who must be watched and taken notice of (24). While in attendance of the meetings in Statuary Hall, Polk, with a front row seat, served as a neophyte Tennessee assistant who closely viewed every single action of the legislatures with a keen eye, before rising in 1826 to make his first notable speech (25). His rise to political power heightened and his intensive effort towards the Jeffersonian-Republicans finally secured him a significant position in the Tennessee House of Representatives, inciting a new phase in his progressing career. Soon after serving Tennessee, the aspiring presidential candidate advanced into the United States House of Representatives for ten years, and in 1835, earned a role as the Speaker of the House for an additional four years (Pinheiro par. 5). Although still in accordance of his mentor Andrew Jackson, Polk nevertheless managed to give advice to others, edging slowly

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