Intellectualism In The Enlightenment

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Short Essay One Rights are desired through the new ideas from the Enlightenment and are expressed through the grievances and problems the people have with their government, but the rights explained are not for all people but for a select few. In The Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen it says, “contempt of the rights of man are the sole causes of public misfortunes”, which is a prime example of Enlightenment thought. In the Enlightenment people such as John Locke developed the idea of a social contract with the government, which stated the government has an obligation to its people and if it fails the people have a right to a new government. The structure also backs up the ideas of the Enlightenment by the phrases “rights of man” …show more content…
In economics, Japan benefited greatly on the global silver trade from owning fifteen percent of the silver and through investments into the agricultural and industrial based industries which led to a long term growth of the country. This growth led to the Tokugawa Shogunate coming into power during a time of conflict between the daimyo and the samurai. Although the economy was growing, it threatened the Tokugawa Shogunate by empowering his rivals which led to a trade restriction to just the Dutch (Strayer and Nelson, 509). European religion and intellectualism infiltrated Japanese society through trade which led to 300,00 Christian converts. This religious disunity threatened the Tokugawa Shogunate and created a policy of isolationism and a purging of the Christian converts. The Dutch was exempted from this policy of isolationism because of their unwilling to convert the Japanese which led to “Dutch learnings” or Rangaku being formed. The “Dutch learning” created a way for the European Enlightenment and scientific findings to reach the Japanese, but the scientific value was limited because of their isolationism (Panopto Chapter 14 PowerPoint …show more content…
The Europeans through conquer and disease cost the Native Americas the majority of their lives, sovereignty, and natural wealth. In Africa, the Europeans casted the blight of slavery onto the African people causing millions of slaves to be brought to the new world to work in hostile conditions. The Atlantic trade brought back wealth and new ideas to Europe in the form of goods and scientific thought. Europeans acquired new economic means, ideas, and political change through the subjugation of the Americas and the enslavement of

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