How Did The Enlightenment Influence The Declaration Of Rights Of Man

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During the late 18th century there was a revolution amidst the people of France to overthrow the corrupt absolute monarchy. Under this monarchy the King had the authority to do as he pleased. Influences of Enlightenment thinking made worthy contributions to the development of the Declaration of the Rights of Man, most notably from Jean Rousseau’s writings of The Social Contract. The Declaration of Rights of Man was an influential document of the French Revolution because its articles advocated the termination of aristocratic privileges, granting birth-given rights to all men and the king no longer had absolute rule over the nation, in which the law protected its citizens. The Enlightenment period gave rise to philosophical thinking which …show more content…
It is an intermediary body established between the subjects and the sovereign to keep them in touch with each other…the only will dominating the government… should be the general will or the law. The governments only power is the people’s power vested in it.” The concept of the King no longer dictating the law of the land motivated turmoil among the people. The people of the Third Estate were once subjects of the king; however, due to the Enlightenment influence it led to their individuality as citizens by birth-given rights protected under the law. A revolutionary idea in this period, especially considering the government rule was an absolute monarchy. The people had no concept of rights; however, under the law the people perceived as equal. Therefore, by Rousseau providing a definitive description of what government should be, prompted the Third Estate representatives to include this contemporary idea, government is for the people, protects the rights of the people and the citizens themselves limited the power of the government.
The reign of absolute monarchy conceived a negative atmosphere in France. However, the philosophies of the Enlightenment period administered an initiation of change. Furthermore, led to significant legislative change, which introduced the concept of people no longer the subjects of the king but as citizens protected by the

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