Female Influence In Hip-Hop Culture

Superior Essays
SALT N PEPA

When looking back through Hip-Hop culture there are a few main names that come to mind such as Kurtis Blow, Easy E, Run DMC, Eric B, and many more. However, males are not the only ones who have shaped and created this culture. When talking about female influence in Hip-Hop it all begins with Salt N’ Pepa. Salt N’ Pepa, one of the first female rap groups, changed the face of Hip-hop. They paved the way for women in this male dominant industry. Salt N’ Pepa has also influenced Hip-hop culture greatly from the 80’s until now by being more pop orientated, having a powerful message, and a unique fashion sense. They were rap legends as well as female and fashion icons. Taking it back to the mid 1980s Salt N’ Pepa was formed. Cheryl
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Another main influence Salt N’ Pepa had on Hip-hop culture was expanding musical acceptance. They accomplished this by being more pop-orientated than other Hip-Hop artists. “We don’t do hard-core rap music, because not everyone understands that. We’re not just out to please our own crowd. Rap is for everyone,” Salt-N-Pepa told David Denicolo in Glamour (Burgess,p1). Salt N’ Pepa did just that by creating music that was relatable to a wider audience. Their first album Hot, Cool,& Vicious set the tone for this new sound they introduced to the …show more content…
They’re music portrayed many pro-feminist viewpoints which was another new thing to the industry. Aside from party and love anthems they made music on women empowerment, respect, and independence from men. David E. Thigpen in Time nailed down Salt-N-Pepa’s subject matter, reporting that they “punctuate soul-tinged R&B melodies with teasing, street-savvy raps about maturity, independence from men and sexual responsibility” (Burgess,p5). Their most successful album Very Necessary was full of meaningful songs whose lyrics spoke about safe sex and feminism. This contrasted to the popular gangster rap that revolved around violence and degradation of

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