Children Parents Influence

Improved Essays
Children, Parents, and Their Influences
Parents in our day and age have a great influence on their children and what their offspring will become in the future. Children watch their parents and copy their every move when they are little because in a child’s eye their parents are heroes. Parents have the greatest influence on their children from sports, to hobbies, their outlook on life, and to know the difference between right and wrong. THESIS! “Designer Babies and Other Fairy Tales” by Maureen Freely is introduced by telling the reader about a three-year-old named, Zain. Zain has blood disorder and needs a cell transplant the catch is, it is hard to find an exact donor for the child. The child’s parent got permission to try and to create
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Even though, they were looked down on because they were not caring for their children. Quindlen goes on to say, “Every moment for children was a teachable moment-and every teachable moment missed was a measure of a lousy mom” (2012, 306). It was not until 1976 when Dr. Spock came out to say it was all right that woman worked and had children because there was baby sitters, nannies, books, and seminars all to help the working mom. When the essay is concluding Quindlen talks about her own family; about how she pushed her kids to do better in school and athletics. When she asked her kids about what they remember about her mothering she got the response that they always had a good time. She then states, “there’s no way to do it and have a good time,” (2012, 307). If we spend time on the how-to, we are not giving our children a chance to make mistakes because we are doing the work for them. By the end of Quindlen’s essay she communicates, “a good time is what her kids remember after all toddler programs and the projects were over and the rest was just scheduling” (2012, …show more content…
Rhoads, he explains his point of view about fathers. In the article Rhoads explains that there are many stay at home fathers that do not get recognized the way that mom’s do, on Mothers Day. When the children are young, they are attracted to, “the mothers estrogen and oxytocin… (2012, 308).” So, why is dad important within this relationship? The relationship between father and child is important because dad teaches them when they are old enough, “how to build and fix things and how to play sports” (for their sons) and for their daughters they provide a, “model of love and fidelity for their wives also they give them confidence within their teenage years (2012, 309).” They also teach both son and daughter how to deal with, “novelty and frustration” and inspire their children to workout their problems and how to deal with them internally. When Rhoads is concluding the essay, he touches on how dads provide for their families and make on all around happier household by not causing stress on the mother. These dads work to provide for their families, “deserve a lot of credit for simply making moms nurturing of children possible.” Dads should be honored on Father’s Day in a different way then moms but appreciation should be given

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