Protestant Reformation Impact

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Introduction
Historian Mr. Philip Schaff mentioned that Protestant Reformation marked the end of the middle ages and the beginning of the modern world (Dr. Jack L. Arnold, 1999). Protestant Reformation was the chief force in the history of the modern civilization. It contributed to the capitalism, the growth of secularism, democracy, and new social structure. The historian Ms. ÁoDài mentioned that Protestant Reformation witnessed the formation of the modern nation-state which from the feudal system to the capitalist system. The believers who can enjoy the autonomy of the religious life are ready for the modern world of the field of the politics, economy, and religion. (History Teaching, 2008). The different contribution of Protestant reformation
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Protestant Reformation had an important impact on the society. Martin Luther proposed the secularization of marriage system. The main contents included the enactment of new marriages, the abolition of secret marriages, government-controlled secular courts or government-authorized churches (Mr. Chan&Mr. Wong, 2013). Protestant Reformation banned secret marriage which originally referred to both men and women exchange marriage in front of the priest but did not need to families’ recognition. Protestant Reformation banned secret marriage that it required that marriage needs to obtain the parent's recognition. The family became the important structure and foundation of society and state. In addition, it caused the regulation and control of marriages. Martin Luther declared that marriage should be a secular matter, not a sacrament (Mr. Chan&Mr. Wong, 2013). Protestant reformation established a secular marriage system that was not disturbed by the church. Marriage was the prerequisite for the establishment of the family, should be strongly advocated. Martin Luther broke the asceticism in order to promote the happiness of marriage. He mentioned that marriage not only cultivates a healthy body, perfect morality, wealth, glory, and family but also makes all the meaningful sexual behavior (Base Christian marriage,1522). Also, he mentioned that "every man should have a wife, every woman …show more content…
The Protestant Reformation destroyed the Catholic Church in medieval society. It promoted the formation of the European nation. Protestant advocated the church should take care of themselves, did not need to accept the protection and control of the government. In addition, the church should be pure. People have the freedom to join the church that the government could not intervene in religious affairs. It is the core idea of liberal democracy. According to the survey, the Western Protestant countries' (such as the United Kingdom, Switzerland, the United States and Germany) democratization faster than the Catholic countries (Mr.Chen Xiao Hong & Mr. Qiu Cheng, 2011). These Protestant countries practiced the liberal democracy. Protestants focused on the responsibilities and individual’s rights. In addition, the Protestant Reformation led to the modern view of politics and law. Protestantism led many people to rebel the authority of the church. The Protestant Reformation cuased the political conflict in Germany and France. It caused the Thirty Years' War of the 17th century (Cole, J, & Symes C, 2014). For example, many German princes converted to Protestantism. It resisted the Hold Roman Empire. After the war, every Germany can determine on its own whether it would be Catholic or Protestant, greatly reducing the authority of the emperor. People’s ideas began to become more

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