Hitler's Economic Depression

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In this essay I will argue that the economic depression got the Nazis to a powerful position in the Reichstag, however when the economic depression declined the amount of votes that the Nazis obtained also decreased in the Reichstag elections. Therefore the economic depression did not make Adolf Hitler Chancellor but other main factors including the oratory skills of Hitler, the propaganda campaign of Goebbels and the fact that Hindenburg and Von Papen thought that they could control Hitler once he was Chancellor. The smaller extreme parties also would not work together although combined they could have had more support than the Nazis. The Treaty of Versailles also contributed to Hitler’s rise to power as the German people were still angry …show more content…
As a result German businesses closed and the banks caved in which lead to six million unemployed. There is a direct correlation between the amount of Nazi electoral votes and the German economic circumstances between 1928 and 1933. In 1928 the German economy was secure and was being supported by the Americans and this relates to the fact that the Nazi party only got 12 seats in the Reichstag. However in 1930 after the Wall Street Crash the Nazis occupied 18.3% of the Reichstag with 107 seats. In the 1932 election in July the Nazis had 230 seats and were the majority in the Reichstag with 37.3% of the votes. This was due to the fact that there were drastic wage cuts, homelessness and poverty. The Weimar coalitions took the blame and this made space for the extremist parties like the Nazis as the people were fed up and wanted drastic action which Hitler promised, to make Germany strong and seek revenge against the Allies. During this period whilst the economy continued to deteriorate the Nazis used every opportunity to attack the coalition government and criticise the weak attempts at revival. In November of 1932, when it became apparent that economic recovery was occurring the Nazi Party lost 34 seats in the Reichstag however were still the clear majority. This decrease of seats in the Reichstag clearly shows that Hitler’s rise to power was due to …show more content…
The upper classes feared a dictatorship in Germany as if the Communists came into power then the wealthy would have their wealth stripped and distributed amongst the lower classes. The upper classes therefore turned to the Nazis who were anti Communist in order to protect their wealth. The SA under the control of the Nazis regularly interrupted Communist meetings and beat up the participants. This struck a fear into the Communists hearts and this may have been why they did not amount a greater opposition. The contributions to the Nazis by the industrialists were extremely useful as it was after the economic depression and the Nazis were short of money so this increased the amount of propaganda that they could release which indirectly allowed Hitler to be voted into the Reichstag. The Communists however could have counteracted this by joining with the Socialist and other extremist parties which would have meant that that the Nazis would have had less support than the parties. This did not occur as they were stubborn and would not work which conveys the weakness of the other parties compared to the strength of

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